Belief systems and social capital as drivers of policy network structure: The case of California regional planning

Adam Douglas Henry, Mark Lubell, Michael McCoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article uses exponential random graph models to investigate the roles of policy-relevant beliefs and social capital as drivers of network structure. The advocacy coalition framework argues that actors with similar policy beliefs are more likely to form coalitions, leading to policy subsystems fragmented into ideological groups. Social capital is defined as trust and norms of reciprocity, which helps cement cooperative relationships. Hypotheses are tested using survey data of policy elites involved in land-use and transportation planning in four regions of California. The findings suggest that coalitions of actors with similar belief systems are knit together by policy brokers seeking to build transitive social relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-444
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Public Administration Research and Theory
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

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