Beyond Tracheostomy: Noninvasive Ventilation and Potential Positive Implications for Speaking and Swallowing

Deanna Britton, Joshua O. Benditt, Jeannette Dee Hoit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For more than a decade, there has been a trend toward increased use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) via mask or mouthpiece as a means to provide ventilatory support without the need for tracheostomy. All indications are that use of NPPV will continue to increase over the next decade and beyond. In this article, we review NPPV, describe two common forms of NPPV, and discuss the potential benefits and challenges of NPPV for speaking and swallowing based on the available literature, our collective clinical experience, and interviews with NPPV users. We also speculate on how future research may inform clinical practice on how to best maximize speaking and swallowing abilities in NPPV users over the next decade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-184
Number of pages12
JournalSeminars in Speech and Language
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Fingerprint

Noninvasive Ventilation
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Tracheostomy
Deglutition
Masks
Interviews

Keywords

  • bilevel positive airway pressure (BPAP)
  • dysphagia
  • Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV)
  • speech

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Beyond Tracheostomy : Noninvasive Ventilation and Potential Positive Implications for Speaking and Swallowing. / Britton, Deanna; Benditt, Joshua O.; Hoit, Jeannette Dee.

In: Seminars in Speech and Language, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.08.2016, p. 173-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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