Bicycle helmet use by children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children are the most frequent victims of bicycling accidents. Among fatal accidents, head injury is the most common cause of death. Because bicycling helmets may reduce the risk of serious head injury, this study was undertaken to determine the frequency with which children and adolescents in various age groups use bicycle helmets. Students were observed arriving at four elementary schools, three junior high schools, three senior high schools, and one university campus. The number of students riding bicycles and the percentage wearing helmets were noted. Of 108 elementary schools bicyclists, only two (1.85%) wore helmets. None of 103 junior high bicyclists and only two of 107 (1.86%) senior high bicyclists wore helmets. Ten percent (15/150) of university bicyclists wore helmets; this is a significantly higher rate than in the other age groups (χ2 = 10.27, P < .01). The failure of school-aged children to wear bicycling helmets represents a potentially serious health hazard. Pediatricians and family physicians have a unique opportunity to provide education to families and communities about the importance of using helmets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-679
Number of pages3
JournalPediatrics
Volume77
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1986

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Head Protective Devices
Bicycling
Craniocerebral Trauma
Accidents
Age Groups
Students
Family Physicians
Cause of Death
Education
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Bicycle helmet use by children. / Weiss, Barry D.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 77, No. 5, 1986, p. 677-679.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiss, BD 1986, 'Bicycle helmet use by children', Pediatrics, vol. 77, no. 5, pp. 677-679.
Weiss, Barry D. / Bicycle helmet use by children. In: Pediatrics. 1986 ; Vol. 77, No. 5. pp. 677-679.
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