Biogeography and paleobiology.

D. Jablonski, Karl Flessa, J. W. Valentine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The traditional focus of paleobiogeographic study has been the province, a statistical entity defined by clusters of range endpoints of invididual taxa. The study of such provinces has been useful in inferring past continental positions (although ambiguities remain that must be resolved using independent geological criteria) and in understanding the role of past global geographies in regulating biotic diversity through changes in the numbers and extent of provinces. This approach can be complemented by the treatment of geographic ranges of taxa as irreducible or emergent traits with far-reaching evolutionary effects upward and downward within a genealogical hierarchy. Temperature tolerances in benthic marine organisms appear to be by-products of selection for enzyme structures imparting favorable activity levels within the normal temperature range rather than direct products of selection for resistance to temperature extremes. Thus, geographic range endpoints, which are also influenced by dispersal capability and the resulting scale of gene flow among disjunct populations, are not direct products of selection. However, the magnitudes of geographic range of species and clades behave as emergent properties and significantly influence taxonomic survivorship during background and mass extinctions in ways that are not extrapolations of effects at lower hierarchical levels. Biogeography shapes macroevolutionary patterns of origination and extinction during times of normal, background extinction and mass extinction. Preferential extinction among regions or among endemic rather than widespread clades can result in strong biases in the nature of the survivors of mass extinctions, with taxa being lost not because of selection against attributes of individual organisms but because of higher-order patterns of geographic selectivity.-from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-90
Number of pages16
JournalPaleobiology
Volume11
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Biological Extinction
paleobiology
biogeography
mass extinction
extinction
Temperature
Aquatic Organisms
Geography
Gene Flow
endpoints
temperature tolerance
Reference Values
survivorship
gene flow
temperature
organisms
Enzymes
geography
enzyme
byproducts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Palaeontology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Jablonski, D., Flessa, K., & Valentine, J. W. (1985). Biogeography and paleobiology. Paleobiology, 11(1), 75-90.

Biogeography and paleobiology. / Jablonski, D.; Flessa, Karl; Valentine, J. W.

In: Paleobiology, Vol. 11, No. 1, 1985, p. 75-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jablonski, D, Flessa, K & Valentine, JW 1985, 'Biogeography and paleobiology.', Paleobiology, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 75-90.
Jablonski D, Flessa K, Valentine JW. Biogeography and paleobiology. Paleobiology. 1985;11(1):75-90.
Jablonski, D. ; Flessa, Karl ; Valentine, J. W. / Biogeography and paleobiology. In: Paleobiology. 1985 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 75-90.
@article{eec90d4eb5fd4bb7b99fb647b7c67b40,
title = "Biogeography and paleobiology.",
abstract = "The traditional focus of paleobiogeographic study has been the province, a statistical entity defined by clusters of range endpoints of invididual taxa. The study of such provinces has been useful in inferring past continental positions (although ambiguities remain that must be resolved using independent geological criteria) and in understanding the role of past global geographies in regulating biotic diversity through changes in the numbers and extent of provinces. This approach can be complemented by the treatment of geographic ranges of taxa as irreducible or emergent traits with far-reaching evolutionary effects upward and downward within a genealogical hierarchy. Temperature tolerances in benthic marine organisms appear to be by-products of selection for enzyme structures imparting favorable activity levels within the normal temperature range rather than direct products of selection for resistance to temperature extremes. Thus, geographic range endpoints, which are also influenced by dispersal capability and the resulting scale of gene flow among disjunct populations, are not direct products of selection. However, the magnitudes of geographic range of species and clades behave as emergent properties and significantly influence taxonomic survivorship during background and mass extinctions in ways that are not extrapolations of effects at lower hierarchical levels. Biogeography shapes macroevolutionary patterns of origination and extinction during times of normal, background extinction and mass extinction. Preferential extinction among regions or among endemic rather than widespread clades can result in strong biases in the nature of the survivors of mass extinctions, with taxa being lost not because of selection against attributes of individual organisms but because of higher-order patterns of geographic selectivity.-from Authors",
author = "D. Jablonski and Karl Flessa and Valentine, {J. W.}",
year = "1985",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "75--90",
journal = "Paleobiology",
issn = "0094-8373",
publisher = "Paleontological Society",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biogeography and paleobiology.

AU - Jablonski, D.

AU - Flessa, Karl

AU - Valentine, J. W.

PY - 1985

Y1 - 1985

N2 - The traditional focus of paleobiogeographic study has been the province, a statistical entity defined by clusters of range endpoints of invididual taxa. The study of such provinces has been useful in inferring past continental positions (although ambiguities remain that must be resolved using independent geological criteria) and in understanding the role of past global geographies in regulating biotic diversity through changes in the numbers and extent of provinces. This approach can be complemented by the treatment of geographic ranges of taxa as irreducible or emergent traits with far-reaching evolutionary effects upward and downward within a genealogical hierarchy. Temperature tolerances in benthic marine organisms appear to be by-products of selection for enzyme structures imparting favorable activity levels within the normal temperature range rather than direct products of selection for resistance to temperature extremes. Thus, geographic range endpoints, which are also influenced by dispersal capability and the resulting scale of gene flow among disjunct populations, are not direct products of selection. However, the magnitudes of geographic range of species and clades behave as emergent properties and significantly influence taxonomic survivorship during background and mass extinctions in ways that are not extrapolations of effects at lower hierarchical levels. Biogeography shapes macroevolutionary patterns of origination and extinction during times of normal, background extinction and mass extinction. Preferential extinction among regions or among endemic rather than widespread clades can result in strong biases in the nature of the survivors of mass extinctions, with taxa being lost not because of selection against attributes of individual organisms but because of higher-order patterns of geographic selectivity.-from Authors

AB - The traditional focus of paleobiogeographic study has been the province, a statistical entity defined by clusters of range endpoints of invididual taxa. The study of such provinces has been useful in inferring past continental positions (although ambiguities remain that must be resolved using independent geological criteria) and in understanding the role of past global geographies in regulating biotic diversity through changes in the numbers and extent of provinces. This approach can be complemented by the treatment of geographic ranges of taxa as irreducible or emergent traits with far-reaching evolutionary effects upward and downward within a genealogical hierarchy. Temperature tolerances in benthic marine organisms appear to be by-products of selection for enzyme structures imparting favorable activity levels within the normal temperature range rather than direct products of selection for resistance to temperature extremes. Thus, geographic range endpoints, which are also influenced by dispersal capability and the resulting scale of gene flow among disjunct populations, are not direct products of selection. However, the magnitudes of geographic range of species and clades behave as emergent properties and significantly influence taxonomic survivorship during background and mass extinctions in ways that are not extrapolations of effects at lower hierarchical levels. Biogeography shapes macroevolutionary patterns of origination and extinction during times of normal, background extinction and mass extinction. Preferential extinction among regions or among endemic rather than widespread clades can result in strong biases in the nature of the survivors of mass extinctions, with taxa being lost not because of selection against attributes of individual organisms but because of higher-order patterns of geographic selectivity.-from Authors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022180973&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022180973&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 75

EP - 90

JO - Paleobiology

JF - Paleobiology

SN - 0094-8373

IS - 1

ER -