Biological sensitivity to context: A test of the hypothesized U-shaped relation between early adversity and stress responsivity

Nila Shakiba, Bruce J Ellis, Nicole R. Bush, W. Thomas Boyce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted signal detection analyses to test for curvilinear, U-shaped relations between early experiences of adversity and heightened physiological responses to challenge, as proposed by biological sensitivity to context theory. Based on analysis of an ethnically diverse sample of 338 kindergarten children (4-6 years old) and their families, we identified levels and types of adversity that, singly and interactively, predicted high (top 25%) and low (bottom 25%) rates of stress reactivity. The results offered support for the hypothesized U-shaped curve and conceptually replicated and extended the work of Ellis, Essex, and Boyce (2005). Across both sympathetic and adrenocortical systems, a disproportionate number of children growing up under conditions characterized by either low or high adversity (as indexed by restrictive parenting, family stress, and family economic condition) displayed heightened stress reactivity, compared with peers growing up under conditions of moderate adversity. Finally, as hypothesized by the adaptive calibration model, a disproportionate number of children who experienced exceptionally stressful family conditions displayed blunted cortisol reactivity to stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Keywords

  • autonomic nervous system
  • biological sensitivity to context
  • early adversity
  • hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis
  • stress reactivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Biological sensitivity to context : A test of the hypothesized U-shaped relation between early adversity and stress responsivity. / Shakiba, Nila; Ellis, Bruce J; Bush, Nicole R.; Boyce, W. Thomas.

In: Development and Psychopathology, 01.01.2019, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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