Body composition assessment in American Indian children

Timothy G Lohman, Benjamin Caballero, John H. Himes, Sally Hunsberger, Raymond Reid, Dawn Stewart, Betty Skipper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the high prevalence of obesity in American Indian children was documented in several surveys that used body mass index (BMI, in kg/m2) as the measure, there is limited information on more direct measurements of body adiposity in this population. The present study evaluated body composition in 81 boys (aged 11.2 ± 0.6 y) and 75 girls (aged 11.0 ± 0.4 y) attending public schools in 6 American Indian communities: White Mountain Apache, Pima, and Tohono O'Odham in Arizona; Oglala Lakota and Sicangu Lakota in South Dakota; and Navajo in New Mexico and Arizona. These communities were participating in the feasibility phase of Pathways, a multicenter intervention for the primary prevention of obesity. Body composition was estimated by using a combination of skinfold thickness and bioelectrical impedance measurements, with a prediction equation validated previously in this same population. The mean BMI was 20.4 ± 4.2 for boys and 21.1 ± 5.0 for girls. The sum of the triceps plus subscapular skinfold thicknesses averaged 28.6 ± 7.0 mm in boys and 34.0 ± 8.0 mm in girls. Mean percentage body fat was 35.6 ± 6.9 in boys and 38.8 ± 8.5 in girls. The results from this study confirmed the high prevalence of excess body fatness in school- age American Indian children and permitted the development of procedures, training, and quality control for measurement of the main outcome variable in the full-scale Pathways study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume69
Issue number4 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Apr 1999

Fingerprint

North American Indians
American Indians
Body Composition
body composition
Skinfold Thickness
skinfold thickness
obesity
Obesity
public schools
Potassium Iodide
bioelectrical impedance
Adiposity
adiposity
Primary Prevention
Child Development
anthropometric measurements
Electric Impedance
Quality Control
Population
body fat

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • American Indians
  • Bioelectrical impedance
  • Body composition
  • Body fat
  • Body mass index
  • Native Americans
  • Obesity
  • School-age children
  • Schoolchildren
  • Skinfold thickness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Lohman, T. G., Caballero, B., Himes, J. H., Hunsberger, S., Reid, R., Stewart, D., & Skipper, B. (1999). Body composition assessment in American Indian children. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 69(4 SUPPL.).

Body composition assessment in American Indian children. / Lohman, Timothy G; Caballero, Benjamin; Himes, John H.; Hunsberger, Sally; Reid, Raymond; Stewart, Dawn; Skipper, Betty.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 69, No. 4 SUPPL., 04.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lohman, TG, Caballero, B, Himes, JH, Hunsberger, S, Reid, R, Stewart, D & Skipper, B 1999, 'Body composition assessment in American Indian children', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 69, no. 4 SUPPL..
Lohman TG, Caballero B, Himes JH, Hunsberger S, Reid R, Stewart D et al. Body composition assessment in American Indian children. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1999 Apr;69(4 SUPPL.).
Lohman, Timothy G ; Caballero, Benjamin ; Himes, John H. ; Hunsberger, Sally ; Reid, Raymond ; Stewart, Dawn ; Skipper, Betty. / Body composition assessment in American Indian children. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1999 ; Vol. 69, No. 4 SUPPL.
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