Body composition for health and performance: A survey of body composition assessment practice carried out by the ad hoc research working group on body composition, health and performance under the auspices of the IOC medical commission

Nanna L. Meyer, Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen, Timothy G Lohman, Timothy R. Ackland, Arthur D. Stewart, Ronald J. Maughan, Suzanne Smith, Wolfram Müller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Successful performers in weight-sensitive sports are characterised by low body mass (BM) and fat content. This often requires chronic energy restriction and acute weight loss practices. Aim To evaluate current use of body composition (BC) assessment methods and identify problems and solutions with current BC approaches. Methods A 40-item survey was developed, including demographic and content questions related to BC assessment. The survey was electronically distributed among international sporting organisations. Frequencies and χ2 analyses were computed. Results 216 responses were received, from 33 countries, representing various institutions, sports and competitive levels. Of the sample, 86% of respondents currently assess BC, most frequently using skinfolds (International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK): 50%; non-ISAK, conventional: 40%; both: 28%), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (38%), bioelectrical impedance (29%), air displacement plethysmography (17%) and hydrostatic weighing (10%). Of those using skinfolds, more at the international level used ISAK, whereas conventional approaches were more reported at regional/national level ( p=0.006). The sport dietitian/nutritionist (57%) and physiologist/sports scientist (54%) were most frequently the professionals assessing BC, followed by MDs and athletic trainers, with some reporting coaches (5%). 36% of 116 respondents assessed hydration status and more (64%) did so at international than regional/national level (36%, p=0.028). Of 125 participants answering the question of whether they thought that BC assessment raised problems, 69% said 'yes', with most providing ideas for solutions. Conclusions Results show high use of BC assessment but also a lack of standardisation and widespread perception of problems related to BM and BC in sport. Future work should emphasise standardisation with appropriate training opportunities and more research on BC and performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1053
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume47
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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Body Composition
Sports
Health
Research
Nutritionists
Surveys and Questionnaires
Plethysmography
Photon Absorptiometry
Electric Impedance
Weight Loss
Fats
Air
Demography
Organizations
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Medicine(all)

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Body composition for health and performance : A survey of body composition assessment practice carried out by the ad hoc research working group on body composition, health and performance under the auspices of the IOC medical commission. / Meyer, Nanna L.; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn; Lohman, Timothy G; Ackland, Timothy R.; Stewart, Arthur D.; Maughan, Ronald J.; Smith, Suzanne; Müller, Wolfram.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 47, No. 16, 11.2013, p. 1044-1053.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background Successful performers in weight-sensitive sports are characterised by low body mass (BM) and fat content. This often requires chronic energy restriction and acute weight loss practices. Aim To evaluate current use of body composition (BC) assessment methods and identify problems and solutions with current BC approaches. Methods A 40-item survey was developed, including demographic and content questions related to BC assessment. The survey was electronically distributed among international sporting organisations. Frequencies and χ2 analyses were computed. Results 216 responses were received, from 33 countries, representing various institutions, sports and competitive levels. Of the sample, 86{\%} of respondents currently assess BC, most frequently using skinfolds (International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK): 50{\%}; non-ISAK, conventional: 40{\%}; both: 28{\%}), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (38{\%}), bioelectrical impedance (29{\%}), air displacement plethysmography (17{\%}) and hydrostatic weighing (10{\%}). Of those using skinfolds, more at the international level used ISAK, whereas conventional approaches were more reported at regional/national level ( p=0.006). The sport dietitian/nutritionist (57{\%}) and physiologist/sports scientist (54{\%}) were most frequently the professionals assessing BC, followed by MDs and athletic trainers, with some reporting coaches (5{\%}). 36{\%} of 116 respondents assessed hydration status and more (64{\%}) did so at international than regional/national level (36{\%}, p=0.028). Of 125 participants answering the question of whether they thought that BC assessment raised problems, 69{\%} said 'yes', with most providing ideas for solutions. Conclusions Results show high use of BC assessment but also a lack of standardisation and widespread perception of problems related to BM and BC in sport. Future work should emphasise standardisation with appropriate training opportunities and more research on BC and performance.",
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AU - Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn

AU - Lohman, Timothy G

AU - Ackland, Timothy R.

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