Boko Haram, Asylum, and Memes of Africa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This opinion piece examines evidence that Boko Haram is being invoked in asylum and refugee contexts. The author suggests that Boko Haram has emerged a meme of contemporary Africa, insofar as it appears to have become a cultural reference tool for wider anxieties and jeopardies, one that is transmitted by repetition and replication. The Boko Haram meme may benefit asylum-seekers and refugees who struggle to document their experiences or sustain their narratives of persecution, and has implications well beyond Nigeria and the continent of Africa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-153
Number of pages6
JournalHawwa
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

refugee
asylum seeker
Nigeria
anxiety
narrative
evidence
experience

Keywords

  • Africa
  • asylum
  • Boko Haram
  • forced marriage
  • meme
  • refugees
  • trafficking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Cultural Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Boko Haram, Asylum, and Memes of Africa. / Lawrance, Benjamin N.

In: Hawwa, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 148-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lawrance, Benjamin N. / Boko Haram, Asylum, and Memes of Africa. In: Hawwa. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 148-153.
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