Booms, busts, and fertility

Testing the becker model using gender-specific labor demand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, I present estimates of the effect of local labor demand shocks on birth rates. To identify exogenous variation in male and female labor demand, I create indices that exploit cross- sectional variation in industry composition, changes in gender-education composition within industries, and growth in national industry employment. Consistent with economic theory, I find that improvements in men's labor market conditions are associated with increases in fertility while improvements in women's labor market conditions have smaller negative effects. I separately find that increases in unemployment rates are associated with small decreases in birth rates at the state level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-29
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Human Resources
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Personnel
Testing
Industry
Chemical analysis
Education
Economics
Labour demand
Fertility
Market conditions
Labour market
Birth rate
Unemployment rate
Economic theory
Demand shocks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Booms, busts, and fertility : Testing the becker model using gender-specific labor demand. / Schaller, Jessamyn C.

In: Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 51, No. 1, 2016, p. 1-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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