Brachial plexus trauma: The morbidity of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis

O. I. Franko, Zain I Khalpey, J. Gates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phrenic nerve palsy has previously been associated with brachial plexus root avulsion; severe unilateral phrenic nerve injury is not uncommonly associated with brachial plexus injury. Brachial plexus injuries can be traumatic (gunshot wounds, lacerations, stretch/contusion and avulsion injuries) or non-traumatic in aetiology (supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block, subclavian vein catheterisation, cardiac surgeries, or obstetric complications such as birth palsy). Despite the known association, the incidence and morbidity of a phrenic nerve injury and hemidiaphragmatic paralysis associated with traumatic brachial plexus stretch injuries remains ill-defined. The incidence of an associated phrenic nerve injury with brachial plexus trauma ranges from 10% to 20%; however, because unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis often presents without symptoms at rest, a high number of phrenic nerve injuries are likely to be overlooked in the setting of brachial plexus injury. A case report is presented of a unilateral phrenic nerve injury associated with brachial plexus stretch injury presenting with a recalcitrant left lower lobe pneumonia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)614-615
Number of pages2
JournalEmergency Medicine Journal
Volume25
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brachial Plexus
Paralysis
Phrenic Nerve
Morbidity
Arm Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Respiratory Paralysis
Subclavian Vein
Gunshot Wounds
Nerve Block
Contusions
Lacerations
Incidence
Catheterization
Thoracic Surgery
Obstetrics
Pneumonia
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Nursing(all)
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Brachial plexus trauma : The morbidity of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis. / Franko, O. I.; Khalpey, Zain I; Gates, J.

In: Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol. 25, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 614-615.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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