Bridging the gap: Simulations meet Knowledge Bases

Gary W. King, Clayton T Morrison, David L. Westbrook, Paul R Cohen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Tapir and Krill are declarative languages for specifying actions and agents, respectively, that can be executed in simulation. As such, they bridge the gap between strictly declarative knowledge bases and strictly executable code. Tapir and Krill components can be combined to produce models of activity which can answer questions about mechanisms and processes using conventional inference methods and simulation. Tapir was used in DARPA's Rapid Knowledge Formation (RKF) project to construct models of military tactics from the Army Field Manual FM3-90. These were then used to build Courses of Actions (COAs) which could be critiqued by declarative reasoning or via Monte Carlo simulation. Tapir and Krill can be read and written by non-knowledge engineers making it an excellent vehicle for Subject Matter Experts to build and critique knowledge bases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsA.F. Sisti, D.A. Trevisani
Pages383-394
Number of pages12
Volume5091
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes
EventPROCEEDINGS OF SPIE SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering: Enabling Technologies for Simulation Science VII - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Apr 22 2003Apr 25 2003

Other

OtherPROCEEDINGS OF SPIE SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering: Enabling Technologies for Simulation Science VII
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period4/22/034/25/03

Fingerprint

tactics
simulation
inference
Engineers
engineers
vehicles
Monte Carlo simulation

Keywords

  • Knowledge Bases
  • Programming Languages
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

King, G. W., Morrison, C. T., Westbrook, D. L., & Cohen, P. R. (2003). Bridging the gap: Simulations meet Knowledge Bases. In A. F. Sisti, & D. A. Trevisani (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 5091, pp. 383-394) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.498092

Bridging the gap : Simulations meet Knowledge Bases. / King, Gary W.; Morrison, Clayton T; Westbrook, David L.; Cohen, Paul R.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / A.F. Sisti; D.A. Trevisani. Vol. 5091 2003. p. 383-394.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

King, GW, Morrison, CT, Westbrook, DL & Cohen, PR 2003, Bridging the gap: Simulations meet Knowledge Bases. in AF Sisti & DA Trevisani (eds), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 5091, pp. 383-394, PROCEEDINGS OF SPIE SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering: Enabling Technologies for Simulation Science VII, Orlando, FL, United States, 4/22/03. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.498092
King GW, Morrison CT, Westbrook DL, Cohen PR. Bridging the gap: Simulations meet Knowledge Bases. In Sisti AF, Trevisani DA, editors, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 5091. 2003. p. 383-394 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.498092
King, Gary W. ; Morrison, Clayton T ; Westbrook, David L. ; Cohen, Paul R. / Bridging the gap : Simulations meet Knowledge Bases. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / A.F. Sisti ; D.A. Trevisani. Vol. 5091 2003. pp. 383-394
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