Bring out your dead! A study of income inequality and life expectancy in the United States, 2000–2010

Terrence Hill, Andrew Jorgenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We test whether income inequality undermines female and male life expectancy in the United States. We employ data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia and two-way fixed effects to model state-level average life expectancy as a function of multiple income inequality measures and time-varying characteristics. We find that state-level income inequality is inversely associated with female and male life expectancy. We observe this general pattern across four measures of income inequality and under the rigorous conditions of state-specific and year-specific fixed effects. If income inequality undermines life expectancy, redistribution policies could actually improve the health of states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalHealth and Place
Volume49
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

difference in income
life expectancy
Life Expectancy
income
policy on property
district
health
Health
effect

Keywords

  • Fixed effects
  • Gender
  • Income inequality
  • Life expectancy
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Bring out your dead! A study of income inequality and life expectancy in the United States, 2000–2010. / Hill, Terrence; Jorgenson, Andrew.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 49, 01.01.2018, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{56ed8a60aace44dfb490dd1d9af3e62c,
title = "Bring out your dead!: A study of income inequality and life expectancy in the United States, 2000–2010",
abstract = "We test whether income inequality undermines female and male life expectancy in the United States. We employ data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia and two-way fixed effects to model state-level average life expectancy as a function of multiple income inequality measures and time-varying characteristics. We find that state-level income inequality is inversely associated with female and male life expectancy. We observe this general pattern across four measures of income inequality and under the rigorous conditions of state-specific and year-specific fixed effects. If income inequality undermines life expectancy, redistribution policies could actually improve the health of states.",
keywords = "Fixed effects, Gender, Income inequality, Life expectancy, Mortality",
author = "Terrence Hill and Andrew Jorgenson",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.11.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "1--6",
journal = "Health and Place",
issn = "1353-8292",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bring out your dead!

T2 - A study of income inequality and life expectancy in the United States, 2000–2010

AU - Hill, Terrence

AU - Jorgenson, Andrew

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - We test whether income inequality undermines female and male life expectancy in the United States. We employ data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia and two-way fixed effects to model state-level average life expectancy as a function of multiple income inequality measures and time-varying characteristics. We find that state-level income inequality is inversely associated with female and male life expectancy. We observe this general pattern across four measures of income inequality and under the rigorous conditions of state-specific and year-specific fixed effects. If income inequality undermines life expectancy, redistribution policies could actually improve the health of states.

AB - We test whether income inequality undermines female and male life expectancy in the United States. We employ data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia and two-way fixed effects to model state-level average life expectancy as a function of multiple income inequality measures and time-varying characteristics. We find that state-level income inequality is inversely associated with female and male life expectancy. We observe this general pattern across four measures of income inequality and under the rigorous conditions of state-specific and year-specific fixed effects. If income inequality undermines life expectancy, redistribution policies could actually improve the health of states.

KW - Fixed effects

KW - Gender

KW - Income inequality

KW - Life expectancy

KW - Mortality

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85033465260&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85033465260&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.11.001

DO - 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.11.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 29128719

AN - SCOPUS:85033465260

VL - 49

SP - 1

EP - 6

JO - Health and Place

JF - Health and Place

SN - 1353-8292

ER -