Build a better mouse: Directly-observed issues in computer use for adults with SMI

Anne C. Black, Kristin L. Serowik, Jean J. Schensul, Anne M. Bowen, Marc I. Rosen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Integrating information technology into healthcare has the potential to bring treatment to hard-to-reach people. Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI), however, may derive limited benefit from these advances in care because of lack of computer ownership and experience. To date, conclusions about the computer skills and attitudes of adults with SMI have been based primarily on self-report. In the current study, 28 psychiatric outpatients with co-occurring cocaine use were interviewed about their computer use and opinions, and 25 were then directly observed using task analysis and think aloud methods as they navigated a multi-component health informational website. Participants reported low rates of computer ownership and use, and negative attitudes towards computers. Self-reported computer skills were higher than demonstrated in the task analysis. However, some participants spontaneously expressed more positive attitudes and greater computer self-efficacy after navigating the website. Implications for increasing access to computer-based health information are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-92
Number of pages12
JournalPsychiatric Quarterly
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Computer use
  • Psychiatric
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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