Building a self-regulatory model of sleep deprivation and deception: The role of caffeine and social influence

David T. Welsh, Aleksander P J Ellis, Michael S. Christian, Ke Michael Mai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Employees are getting less sleep, which has been shown to deplete self-regulatory resources and increase unethical behavior (Barnes, Schaubroeck, Huth, & Ghumman, 2011; Christian & Ellis, 2011). In this study, we extend the original mediated model by examining the role of 2 moderators in the relationship between sleep deprivation, depletion, and deceptive behavior. First, we derive psychological arguments from the psychopharmacology literature to hypothesize that caffeine moderates the relationship between sleep deprivation and depletion by replenishing self-regulatory resources. Second, we draw from recent research in social psychology to hypothesize that social influence moderates the relationship between depletion and deceptive behavior, such that depleted individuals are less able to resist the negative influence of others. Results of a laboratory study provide support for our expanded model combining mediation and moderation, adding to our understanding of the role of sleep deprivation in the incidence of workplace deception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1268-1277
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

Fingerprint

Sleep Deprivation
Deception
Caffeine
Psychopharmacology
Social Psychology
Workplace
Sleep
Psychology
Incidence
Research

Keywords

  • Behavioral ethics
  • Caffeine
  • Deception
  • Self-regulation
  • Social influence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Building a self-regulatory model of sleep deprivation and deception : The role of caffeine and social influence. / Welsh, David T.; Ellis, Aleksander P J; Christian, Michael S.; Mai, Ke Michael.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 99, No. 6, 01.11.2014, p. 1268-1277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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