Burden of lower respiratory infections in the Eastern Mediterranean Region between 1990 and 2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study

GBD 2015 Eastern Mediterranean Region Lower Respiratory Infections Collaborators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: We used data from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study (GBD) to calculate the burden of lower respiratory infections (LRIs) in the 22 countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) from 1990 to 2015. Methods: We conducted a systematic analysis of mortality and morbidity data for LRI and its specific etiologic factors, including pneumococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, Respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. We used modeling methods to estimate incidence, deaths, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). We calculated burden attributable to known risk factors for LRI. Results: In 2015, LRIs were the fourth-leading cause of DALYs, causing 11,098,243 (95% UI 9,857,095–12,396,566) DALYs and 191,114 (95% UI 170,934–210,705) deaths. The LRI DALY rates were higher than global estimates in 2015. The highest and lowest age-standardized rates of DALYs were observed in Somalia and Lebanon, respectively. Undernutrition in childhood and ambient particulate matter air pollution in the elderly were the main risk factors. Conclusions: Our findings call for public health strategies to reduce the level of risk factors in each age group, especially vulnerable child and elderly populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-108
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health
Volume63
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Keywords

  • DALY
  • Eastern Mediterranean Region
  • Incidence
  • Lower respiratory infection
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Burden of lower respiratory infections in the Eastern Mediterranean Region between 1990 and 2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this