Caffeine and screen time in adolescence: Associations with short sleep and obesity

Amy A. Drescher, James L. Goodwin, Graciela Emilia Silva Torres, Stuart F Quan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the associations between sleep duration and obesity incidence and risk factors among preadolescents and adolescents. Design: Cross-sectional study of a community based cohort Setting: The Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea follow-up study (TuCASA) cohort. Participants: 319 Caucasian and Hispanics between 10-17 years. Main Outcome: Parent-reported sleep duration and BMI zscore. Outcome Measures: Surveys of electronic screen time, dietary and caffeine intake, exercise and sleep habits by parents, and anthropometric measures. Results: Parent-reported total sleep time (TST) was inversely associated with BMI z-score, but not signifi cantly correlated with any of the examined nutritional variables or exercise components. Hispanic ethnicity was associated with signifi cantly lower parent-reported TST and higher BMI z-score. Parentreported TST was inversely related to electronic screen time and caffeine use, but these fi ndings were differentially related to age. Caffeine consumption was associated with decreasing parent-reported TST primarily in older adolescents. Electronic screen time was associated with lower parent-reported TST in Younger adolescents. Conclusions: Hispanic ethnicity and parental reports of TST were found to be the most closely associated with BMI z-score. Decreased TST and increased caffeine intake and screen time may result in higher obesity risk in the adolescent population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-342
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2011

Fingerprint

Caffeine
Sleep
Obesity
Hispanic Americans
Exercise
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Habits
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Caffeine
  • Hispanic
  • Obesity
  • Sleep
  • Video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology

Cite this

Caffeine and screen time in adolescence : Associations with short sleep and obesity. / Drescher, Amy A.; Goodwin, James L.; Silva Torres, Graciela Emilia; Quan, Stuart F.

In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Vol. 7, No. 4, 15.08.2011, p. 337-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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