Calculating the cultural significance of American Indian plants: Paiute and shoshone ethnobotany at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

Richard W Stoffle, David B. Halmo, Michaej L. Evans, John E. Olmsted

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ethnobotanical studies are of interest to ethnographers, ethnobotanists, and cultural historians who study the prehistoric, historic, and contempoary contribution of plants to the sociocultural adaptations of American Indian people. A critical research issue is evaluating the differential contribution of plants to American Indian adaptive strategies. This article takes the first quantitative plant evaluation model and combines it with field data from the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ethnobotany study to explore the utility of this model for evaluating the cultural significance of botanical resources to contemporary American Indian peoples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-432
Number of pages17
JournalAmerican Anthropologist
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

American Indian
historian
evaluation
resources
Shoshone
American Indians
Paiute
Ethnobotany
Mountains
Cultural Significance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Calculating the cultural significance of American Indian plants : Paiute and shoshone ethnobotany at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. / Stoffle, Richard W; Halmo, David B.; Evans, Michaej L.; Olmsted, John E.

In: American Anthropologist, Vol. 92, No. 2, 06.1990, p. 416-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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