Can international boycotts transform political systems? The cases of Cuba and South Africa

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10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The economic embargo against Cuba has been widely promoted as a way to hasten the end of the Castro regime. Historically, however, the connection between embargoes and regime change is mediated by a complex of political, social, and economic conditions. Labor-market bottlenecks and domestic elite opposition, decisive factors in the South African case, are absent from that of Cuba. This study uses the factors derived from an analysis of South Africa to compare the Cuban case and concludes that the embargo against Cuba cannot have its intended results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-146
Number of pages32
JournalLatin American Politics and Society
Volume43
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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embargo
boycott
political system
Cuba
economic conditions
labor market
transform
economics
regime
opposition
elite
analysis
Africa
social condition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

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