Can Pyramids and Seed Mixtures Delay Resistance to Bt Crops?

Yves Carriere, Jeffrey A. Fabrick, Bruce E Tabashnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The primary strategy for delaying the evolution of pest resistance to transgenic crops that produce insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) entails refuges of plants that do not produce Bt toxins and thus allow survival of susceptible pests. Recent advances include using refuges together with Bt crop 'pyramids' that make two or more Bt toxins effective against the same pest, and planting seed mixtures yielding random distributions of pyramided Bt and non-Bt corn plants within fields. We conclude that conditions often deviate from those favoring the success of pyramids and seed mixtures, particularly against pests with low inherent susceptibility to Bt toxins. For these problematic pests, promising approaches include using larger refuges and integrating Bt crops with other pest management tactics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-302
Number of pages12
JournalTrends in Biotechnology
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Bacillus thuringiensis
Bacilli
Crops
Seed
Seeds
Pest Control
Zea mays
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cross-resistance
  • Genetically engineered
  • Redundant killing
  • Resistance management
  • Sustainability
  • Transgenic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Can Pyramids and Seed Mixtures Delay Resistance to Bt Crops? / Carriere, Yves; Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

In: Trends in Biotechnology, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 291-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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