Cancer prevention education in U.S. medical schools

A curricular assessment

Jennifer L. Herl, Douglas L Taren, Ann M. Taylor, Tamsen L Bassford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. The integration of cancer prevention education (CPE) into medical school curricula is occurring at a discouragingly slow rate despite current trends in curricular reform and professional and educational recommendations. Methods and results. An assessment of medical school web sites revealed only one school incorporating cancer prevention education into its curriculum. Additionally, a thorough literature review and listserv survey indicated that 15 medical schools had included a CPE component in their curricula. Conclusions. The limited number of medical schools that can be demonstrated to teach cancer prevention illustrates the need for curricular reform in this direction to fulfill existing prevention recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-218
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume14
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1999

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Medical Schools
Curriculum
Education
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Cancer prevention education in U.S. medical schools : A curricular assessment. / Herl, Jennifer L.; Taren, Douglas L; Taylor, Ann M.; Bassford, Tamsen L.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 14, No. 4, 12.1999, p. 214-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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