Carbon and Nitrogen Export from Semiarid Uplands to Perennial Rivers: Connections and Missing Links, San Pedro River, Arizona, USA

Thomas Meixner, Paul Brooks, James Hogan, Carlos Soto, Scott Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Investigations of biogeochemical processes in semiarid environments have largely focused on either plot studies in the uplands or on in-stream and near stream reaction or transport studies. Recent research permits us to synthesize a conceptual model of how uplands and riparian systems are linked in semiarid climates specific to the San Pedro River basin in Arizona. These studies have demonstrated significant export of both dissolved and sediment associated carbon and nitrogen from the uplands into the channel network of semiarid river systems. Likewise research has demonstrated that riparian areas are biogeochemically active, with the potential to rapidly respire inputs of organic matter, releasing carbon back to the atmosphere and inorganic nitrogen into the water column or back to the atmosphere through denitrification. For the San Pedro, a total of more than 80% of both carbon and nitrogen export from the uplands that is observed in small catchments is not observed at the larger river system scale, indicating that this carbon and nitrogen must be either stored, taken up by vegetation or returned to the atmosphere at scales between the small catchment (1-1000ha) and large river systems scale (∼320,000ha). In summary, existing research shows that the uplands contribute significant amounts of material into the stream and near stream zone, and that this imported material influences nutrient conditions in aquatic systems. These conclusions point out significant gaps in developing a complete understanding of the reactions of carbon and nitrogen as material is transported from the uplands through ephemeral and perennial channel networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)546-559
Number of pages14
JournalGeography Compass
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Rivers
river
Nitrogen
Carbon
Catchments
nitrogen
carbon
river system
atmosphere
catchment
Denitrification
inorganic nitrogen
Biological materials
Nutrients
denitrification
Sediments
river basin
water column
climate
organic matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Computers in Earth Sciences
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Carbon and Nitrogen Export from Semiarid Uplands to Perennial Rivers : Connections and Missing Links, San Pedro River, Arizona, USA. / Meixner, Thomas; Brooks, Paul; Hogan, James; Soto, Carlos; Simpson, Scott.

In: Geography Compass, Vol. 6, No. 9, 09.2012, p. 546-559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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