Carbon monoxide attenuates the effects of snake venoms containing metalloproteinases with fibrinogenase or thrombin-like activity on plasmatic coagulation

Vance G. Nielsen, Charles M. Bazzell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Exposure of plasma to iron and carbon monoxide (CO) renders fibrinogen resistant to fibrinogenolytic or thrombin-like activity contained in pit viper venom. However, the direct effects of iron/CO on venom activity are unknown. Thus, we assessed if four different, metalloproteinase containing snake venoms exposed to iron/CO or CO alone could attenuate their fibrinogenolytic or thrombin-like activity. Venom (0-500 μg ml-1) was exposed to 0-10 μM FeCl3 and/or 0-100 μM carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2), or inactivated CORM-2 (iCORM-2) for 3 min at room temperature. Venom solution (0-8 μg ml-1 final concentration) was then placed in citrated human plasma containing tissue factor, followed by CaCl2 addition for commencement of coagulation. Data were determined with thrombelastography for 10-15 min at 37 °C. Iron had no effect on the first venom tested, so only CO was investigated subsequently. Exposure of venom to CO attenuated fibrinogenolytic or thrombin-like activity, and iCORM-2 did not affect the venom activities. Further investigation of the effect of CO exposure on similar venoms is justified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1973-1979
Number of pages7
JournalMedChemComm
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Organic Chemistry

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