Catecholamine elevation in iron deficiency

E. Dillmann, David G Johnson, J. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron-deficient rats have increased blood and urinary catecholamines regardless of whether anemia is or is not present. The catecholamine response in both iron-deficient and control animals is largely temperature dependent, showing little difference at the isothermic temperature of 30°C but a two- to threefold increase in iron-deficient animals over controls at lower temperatures. The iron-deficient rat is unable to maintain body temperature at 4°C and this is independent of anemia or food intake. When animals are run on the treadmill for 4 hr, body temperatures increase but the difference observated at 6°C between iron-deficient and control animals persists. The underlying abnormality in temperature regulation and in catecholamine response disappeared after 6 days of iron therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume6
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979
Externally publishedYes

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Catecholamines
Iron
Temperature
Body Temperature
Anemia
Eating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Catecholamine elevation in iron deficiency. / Dillmann, E.; Johnson, David G; Martin, J.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.01.1979.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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