Ceftiofur use in finishing swine barns and the recovery of fecal Escherichia coli or Salmonella spp. Resistant to ceftriaxone

Eric A. Lutz, Marlena J. McCarty, Dixie F. Mollenkopf, Julie A. Funk, Wondwossen A. Gebreyes, Thomas E. Wittum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the association between ceftiofur use policy in finishing swine barns and recovery of fecal Escherichia coli or Salmonella spp. resistant to ceftriaxone. The study population included 54 finishing swine barns from three companies located in North Carolina. The barns were each classified according to their reported therapeutic ceftiofur use rates of Rare, Moderate, and Common. Fecal samples from the barns were cultured for the presence of E. coli and Salmonella spp. resistant to ceftriaxone using selective media designed to recover rare organisms expressing the AmpC β-lactamase phenotype. A total of 1899 swine fecal samples yielded 1193 E. coli (63%) resistant to ceftriaxone. Recovery rates by ceftiofur use classification were 45% for Rare, 73% for Moderate, and 68% Common ceftiofur use groups. Barns reporting Rare ceftiofur use had a lower odds of recovery of E. coli (OR=0.32; p<0.001) resistant to ceftriaxone compared to Common use barns. The overall Salmonella spp. prevalence was 63.8% (n=714). Of these, 65 Salmonella were resistant to ceftriaxone with the highest rate (6%) found in the Common ceftiofur use group, followed by Rare (4.1%) and Moderate (0.15%). The odds of recovery of Salmonella resistant to ceftriaxone were similar for barns with ceftiofur use classified as Rare and Common. Samples from barns with ceftiofur use classified as Moderate had a lower odds (OR=0.02; p<0.01) of recovery of Salmonella resistant to ceftriaxone than barns classified as Common. Our result is consistent with the hypothesis that the use of ceftiofur in finishing swine barns, beyond its rare application, may influence the recovery of enteric E. coli with resistance to cephalosporin drugs, although other unmeasured factors appear to be important in the recovery of cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella. The dissemination of enteric bacteria with resistance to cephalosporins has the potential to impact both veterinary and human therapeutic treatment options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1229-1234
Number of pages6
JournalFoodborne Pathogens and Disease
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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