Cellular evaluation of the toxicity of combustion derived particulate matter: influence of particle grinding and washing on cellular response

Matthew E. Katterman, Stephanie Birchard, Supapan Seraphin, Mark R. Riley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is increasing interest in continual monitoring of air for the presence of inhalation health hazards, such as particulate matter, produced through combustion of fossil fuels. Currently there are no means to rapidly evaluate the relative toxicity of materials or to reliably predict potential health impact due to the complexity of the composition, size, and physical properties of particulate matter. This research evaluates the feasibility of utilizing cell cultures as the biological recognition element of an inhalation health monitoring system. The response of rat lung type II epithelial (RLE-6TN) cells to a variety of combustion derived particulates and their components has been evaluated. The focus of the current work is an evaluation of how particles are delivered to a cellular sensing array and to what degree does washing or grinding of the particles impacts the cellular response. There were significant differences in the response of these lung cells to PM's of varying sources. Mechanical grinding or washing was found to alter the toxicity of some of these particulates; however these effects were strongly dependent on the fuel source. Washing reduced toxicity of oil PM's, but had little effect on those from diesel or coal. Mechanical grinding could significantly increase the toxicity of coal PM's, but not for oil or diesel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-573
Number of pages7
JournalChemosphere
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Keywords

  • Cell culture
  • Human lung cells
  • Particulate matter toxicity
  • Toxicity monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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