Cerebral correlates of amygdala responses during non-conscious perception of facial affect in adolescent and pre-adolescent children

William Killgore, Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During nonconscious perception of facial affect, healthy adults commonly activate a right-lateralized pathway comprising the superior colliculus, pulvinar, and amygdala. Whether this system is fully developed prior to adulthood is unknown. Twenty-three healthy adolescents underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing fearful, angry, and happy faces, backward masked by neutral faces. Left amygdala activation differed among the three affects, showing reductions to masked anger and increases to masked fear and happy faces. During masked fear, left amygdala activation correlated positively with extrastriate cortex and temporal poles and negatively with precuneus and middle cingulate gyrus. Responses of the left amygdala to masked anger correlated positively with right parahippocampal gyrus and negatively with dorsal anterior cingulate. Amygdala responses to masked happy faces were uncorrelated with other brain regions. Contrary to the right-lateralized pathway seen in adults, adolescents show evidence of a predominantly left-lateralized extrastriate pathway during masked presentations of facial affect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-43
Number of pages11
JournalCognitive Neuroscience
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Amygdala
Gyrus Cinguli
Anger
Fear
Pulvinar
Parahippocampal Gyrus
Parietal Lobe
Superior Colliculi
Visual Cortex
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Development
  • Face perception
  • FMRI
  • Limbic system
  • Masked affect
  • Neuroimaging
  • Nonconscious

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Cerebral correlates of amygdala responses during non-conscious perception of facial affect in adolescent and pre-adolescent children. / Killgore, William; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.

In: Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2010, p. 33-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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