Ceres and the terrestrial planets impact cratering record

R. G. Strom, S. Marchi, Renu Malhotra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dwarf planet Ceres, the largest object in the Main Asteroid Belt, has a surface that exhibits a range of crater densities for a crater diameter range of 5–300 km. In all areas the shape of the craters’ size-frequency distribution is very similar to those of the most ancient heavily cratered surfaces on the terrestrial planets. The most heavily cratered terrain on Ceres covers ∼15% of its surface and has a crater density similar to the highest crater density on <1% of the lunar highlands. This region of higher crater density on Ceres probably records the high impact rate at early times and indicates that the other 85% of Ceres was partly resurfaced after the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) at ∼4 Ga. The Ceres cratering record strongly indicates that the period of Late Heavy Bombardment originated from an impactor population whose size-frequency distribution resembles that of the Main Belt Asteroids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-108
Number of pages5
JournalIcarus
Volume302
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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cratering
terrestrial planets
craters
crater
planet
asteroid belts
frequency distribution
asteroid
bombardment
dwarf planets
highlands
impactors
population size

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Ceres and the terrestrial planets impact cratering record. / Strom, R. G.; Marchi, S.; Malhotra, Renu.

In: Icarus, Vol. 302, 01.03.2018, p. 104-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strom, R. G. ; Marchi, S. ; Malhotra, Renu. / Ceres and the terrestrial planets impact cratering record. In: Icarus. 2018 ; Vol. 302. pp. 104-108.
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