Changes in reproductive biomarkers in an endangered fish species (bonytail chub, Gila elegans) exposed to low levels of organic wastewater compounds in a controlled experiment

David B. Walker, Nicholas V. Paretti, Gail Cordy, Timothy S. Gross, Steven D. Zaugg, Edward T. Furlong, Dana W. Kolpin, William J Matter, Jessica Gwinn, Dennis McIntosh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In arid regions of the southwestern United States, municipal wastewater treatment plants commonly discharge treated effluent directly into streams that would otherwise be dry most of the year. A better understanding is needed of how effluent-dependent waters (EDWs) differ from more natural aquatic ecosystems and the ecological effect of low levels of environmentally persistent organic wastewater compounds (OWCs) with distance from the pollutant source. In a controlled experiment, we found 26 compounds common to municipal effluent in treatment raceways all at concentrations <1.0 μg/L. Male bonytail chub (Gila elegans) in tanks containing municipal effluent had significantly lower levels of 11-ketotestosterone (p = 0.021) yet higher levels of 17β-estradiol (p = 0.002) and vitellogenin (p = 0.036) compared to control male fish. Female bonytail chub in treatment tanks had significantly lower concentrations of 17β-estradiol than control females (p = 0.001). The normally inverse relationship between primary male and female sex hormones, expected in un-impaired fish, was greatly decreased in treatment (r = 0.00) versus control (r = -0.66) female fish. We found a similar, but not as significant, trend between treatment (r = -0.45) and control (r = -0.82) male fish. Measures of fish condition showed no significant differences between male or female fish housed in effluent or clean water. Inter-sex condition did not occur and testicular and ovarian cells appeared normal for the respective developmental stage and we observed no morphological alteration in fish. The population-level impacts of these findings are uncertain. Studies examining the long-term, generational and behavioral effects to aquatic organisms chronically exposed to low levels of OWC mixtures are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-143
Number of pages11
JournalAquatic Toxicology
Volume95
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Endangered Species
Cyprinidae
Waste Water
endangered species
wastewater
biomarker
biomarkers
Fishes
Biomarkers
effluents
fish
effluent
experiment
estradiol
Estradiol
Southwestern United States
sex hormone
intersex
Vitellogenins
raceways

Keywords

  • 11-Ketotestosterone
  • 17β-Estradiol
  • Bonytail chub
  • Effluent-dependent
  • Histopathology
  • Vitellogenin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Changes in reproductive biomarkers in an endangered fish species (bonytail chub, Gila elegans) exposed to low levels of organic wastewater compounds in a controlled experiment. / Walker, David B.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Cordy, Gail; Gross, Timothy S.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Matter, William J; Gwinn, Jessica; McIntosh, Dennis.

In: Aquatic Toxicology, Vol. 95, No. 2, 2009, p. 133-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walker, David B. ; Paretti, Nicholas V. ; Cordy, Gail ; Gross, Timothy S. ; Zaugg, Steven D. ; Furlong, Edward T. ; Kolpin, Dana W. ; Matter, William J ; Gwinn, Jessica ; McIntosh, Dennis. / Changes in reproductive biomarkers in an endangered fish species (bonytail chub, Gila elegans) exposed to low levels of organic wastewater compounds in a controlled experiment. In: Aquatic Toxicology. 2009 ; Vol. 95, No. 2. pp. 133-143.
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AU - Matter, William J

AU - Gwinn, Jessica

AU - McIntosh, Dennis

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