Changes in streamflow dynamics in the Rhine basin under three high-resolution regional climate scenarios

Ruud Hurkmans, Wilco Terink, Remko Uijlenhoet, Paul Torfs, Daniela Jacob, Peter A. Troch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

Because of global warming, the hydrologic behavior of the Rhine basin is expected to shift from a combined snowmelt-and rainfall-driven regime to a more rainfall-dominated regime. Previous impact assessments have indicated that this leads, on average, to increasing streamflow by ~30% in winter and spring and decreasing streamflow by a similar value in summer. In this study, high-resolution (0.088°) regional climate scenarios conducted with the regional climate model REMO (REgional MOdel) for the Rhine basin are used to force a macroscale hydrological model. These climate scenarios are based on model output from the ECHAM5-Max Planck Institute Ocean Model (MPI-OM) global climate model, which is in turn forced by three Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) emission scenarios: A2, A1B, and B1. The Variable Infiltration Capacity model (VIC; version 4.0.5) is used to examine changes in streamflow at various locations throughout the Rhine basin. Average streamflow, peak flows, low flows, and several water balance terms are evaluated for both the first and second half of the twenty-first century. The results reveal a distinct contrast between those periods. The first half is dominated by increased precipitation, causing increased streamflow throughout the year. During the second half of the century, a streamflow increase in winter/spring and a decrease in summer is found, similar to previous studies. This is caused by 1) temperature and evapotranspiration, which are considerably higher during the second half of the century; 2) decreased precipitation in summer; and 3) an earlier start of the snowmelt season. Magnitudes of peak flows increase during both periods, and the magnitudes of streamflow droughts increase only during the second half of the century.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)679-699
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Climate
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Changes in streamflow dynamics in the Rhine basin under three high-resolution regional climate scenarios'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this