Changes in ventricular repolarization duration during typical daily emotion in patients with long QT syndrome

Richard D Lane, Wojciech Zareba, Harry T. Reis, Derick R. Peterson, Arthur J. Moss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Intense emotions are known triggers of sudden cardiac death. However, the effect of typical daily emotion on repolarization has not been examined. We examined whether QT interval changes as a function of typical daily emotion in patients at risk for cardiac events in the context of emotion. Methods: We studied 161 patients (n = 114 females; mean age, 35 years) with the congenital form of the Long QT Syndrome during daily activities. Each day for 3 days, a 12-hour Holter recording was completed. Patients were paged ten times per day at random times and rated the intensity of 16 prespecified emotions during the preceding 5 minutes. Measurements of QT interval and interbeat intervals were synchronized with emotion ratings. Results: Low Arousal Positive Affect was associated with significant increases in QT interval corrected for heart rate (using Fridericia's QTc) (p < .001), whereas higher arousal Activated Positive Affect (p < .001) and Activated Negative Affect (p < .01) were associated with significant decreases in QTc. Changes in QTc as a function of daily emotion ranged from 5-ms increases to 11-ms decreases. High-frequency heart rate variability (vagal tone) was positively correlated with QTc (p < .001). The effects of each positive emotion variable on QTc were greater in LQT2 than LQT1 patients (p < .001). Conclusion: Ventricular repolarization duration (QTc) changes dynamically as a function of daily emotion. These changes are relatively small and do not constitute a risk in themselves. In the context of other risk factors, however, they may contribute to ventricular arrhythmias in vulnerable populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-105
Number of pages8
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Long QT Syndrome
Emotions
Arousal
Heart Rate
Sudden Cardiac Death
Vulnerable Populations
Cardiac Arrhythmias

Keywords

  • ecological momentary assessments
  • emotion
  • heart rate
  • heart rate variability
  • Long QT Syndrome
  • QT interval

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Changes in ventricular repolarization duration during typical daily emotion in patients with long QT syndrome. / Lane, Richard D; Zareba, Wojciech; Reis, Harry T.; Peterson, Derick R.; Moss, Arthur J.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 73, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 98-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lane, Richard D ; Zareba, Wojciech ; Reis, Harry T. ; Peterson, Derick R. ; Moss, Arthur J. / Changes in ventricular repolarization duration during typical daily emotion in patients with long QT syndrome. In: Psychosomatic Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 73, No. 1. pp. 98-105.
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