Changing attitudes toward influenza vaccination in U.S. kidney transplant programs over the past decade

W. James Chon, Pradeep V. Kadambi, Robert C. Harland, J. Richard Thistlethwaite, Bradford L. West, Suneel Udani, Rajiv Poduval, Michelle A. Josephson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objectives: Influenza infection in transplant recipients is often associated with significant morbidity. Surveys were conducted in 1999 and 2009 to find out if the influenza vaccination practices in the U.S. transplant programs had changed over the past 10 years. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: In 1999, a survey of the 217 United Network for Organ Sharing-certified kidney and kidney-pancreas transplant centers in the U.S. was conducted regarding their influenza vaccination practice patterns. A decade later, a second similar survey of 239 transplant programs was carried out. Results: The 2009 respondents, compared with 1999, were more likely to recommend vaccination for kidney (94.5% versus 84.4%, P = 0.02) and kidney-pancreas recipients (76.8% versus 48.5%, P < 0.001), family members of transplant recipients (52.5% versus 21.0%, P < 0.001), and medical staff caring for transplant patients (79.6% versus 40.7%, P < 0.001). Physicians and other members of the transplant team were more likely to have been vaccinated in 2009 compared with 1999 (84.2% versus 62.3% of physicians, P < 0.001 and 91.2% versus 50.3% of nonphysicians, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests a greater adoption of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention influenza vaccination guidelines by U.S. transplant programs in vaccinating solid-organ transplant recipients, close family contacts, and healthcare workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1637-1641
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume5
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Human Influenza
Vaccination
Transplants
Kidney
Pancreas
Physicians
Medical Staff
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Guidelines
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Infection
Transplant Recipients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Changing attitudes toward influenza vaccination in U.S. kidney transplant programs over the past decade. / Chon, W. James; Kadambi, Pradeep V.; Harland, Robert C.; Thistlethwaite, J. Richard; West, Bradford L.; Udani, Suneel; Poduval, Rajiv; Josephson, Michelle A.

In: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 5, No. 9, 01.09.2010, p. 1637-1641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chon, W. James ; Kadambi, Pradeep V. ; Harland, Robert C. ; Thistlethwaite, J. Richard ; West, Bradford L. ; Udani, Suneel ; Poduval, Rajiv ; Josephson, Michelle A. / Changing attitudes toward influenza vaccination in U.S. kidney transplant programs over the past decade. In: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 9. pp. 1637-1641.
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abstract = "Background and objectives: Influenza infection in transplant recipients is often associated with significant morbidity. Surveys were conducted in 1999 and 2009 to find out if the influenza vaccination practices in the U.S. transplant programs had changed over the past 10 years. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: In 1999, a survey of the 217 United Network for Organ Sharing-certified kidney and kidney-pancreas transplant centers in the U.S. was conducted regarding their influenza vaccination practice patterns. A decade later, a second similar survey of 239 transplant programs was carried out. Results: The 2009 respondents, compared with 1999, were more likely to recommend vaccination for kidney (94.5{\%} versus 84.4{\%}, P = 0.02) and kidney-pancreas recipients (76.8{\%} versus 48.5{\%}, P < 0.001), family members of transplant recipients (52.5{\%} versus 21.0{\%}, P < 0.001), and medical staff caring for transplant patients (79.6{\%} versus 40.7{\%}, P < 0.001). Physicians and other members of the transplant team were more likely to have been vaccinated in 2009 compared with 1999 (84.2{\%} versus 62.3{\%} of physicians, P < 0.001 and 91.2{\%} versus 50.3{\%} of nonphysicians, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests a greater adoption of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention influenza vaccination guidelines by U.S. transplant programs in vaccinating solid-organ transplant recipients, close family contacts, and healthcare workers.",
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