Character, Incidence, and Predictors of Knee Pain and Activity after Infrapatellar Intramedullary Nailing of an Isolated Tibia Fracture

the SPRINT Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To study the activity and incidence of knee pain after sustaining an isolated tibia fracture treated with an infrapatellar intramedullary nail at 1 year. Design: Retrospective review of prospective cohort. Setting: Multicenter Academic and Community hospitals. Patients: Four hundred thirty-seven patients with an isolated tibia fracture completed a 12-month assessment on pain and self-reported activity. Intervention: Infrapatellar intramedullary nail. Outcomes: Demographic information, comorbid conditions, injury characteristics, and surgical technique were recorded. Knee pain was defined on a 1-7 scale with 1 being "no pain" and 7 being a "very great deal of pain." Knee pain >4 was considered clinically significant. Patients reported if they were "able," "able with difficulty," or "unable" to perform the following activities: kneel, run, climb stairs, and walk prolonged. Variables were tested in multilevel multivariable regression analyses. Results: In knee pain, 11% of patients reported a "good deal" to a "very great deal" of pain (>4), and 52% of patients reported "no" or "very little" pain at 12 months. In activity at 12 months, 26% and 29% of patients were unable to kneel or run, respectively, and 31% and 35% of patients, respectively, stated they were able with difficulty or unable to use stairs or walk. Conclusions: Clinically significant knee pain (>4/7) was present in 11% of patients 1 year after a tibia fracture. Of note, 31%-71% of patients had difficulty performing or were unable to perform routine daily activities of kneeling, running, and stair climbing, or walking prolonged distances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-141
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Intramedullary Fracture Fixation
Tibia
Knee
Pain
Incidence
Nails
Intraoperative Complications
Community Hospital
Pain Measurement
Running
Walking
Cohort Studies
Regression Analysis
Demography

Keywords

  • functional outcome
  • intramedullary nail
  • knee pain
  • tibia fracture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Character, Incidence, and Predictors of Knee Pain and Activity after Infrapatellar Intramedullary Nailing of an Isolated Tibia Fracture. / the SPRINT Investigators.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 135-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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keywords = "functional outcome, intramedullary nail, knee pain, tibia fracture",
author = "{the SPRINT Investigators} and William Obremskey and Julie Agel and Kristin Archer and Philip To and Paul Tornetta and Mohit Bhandari and Gordon Guyatt and Sanders, {David W.} and Schemitsch, {Emil H.} and Marc Swiontkowski and Stephen Walter and Sheila Sprague and Diane Heels-Ansdell and Lisa Buckingham and Pamela Leece and Helena Viveiros and Tashay Mignott and Natalie Ansell and Natalie Sidorkewicz and Claire Bombardier and Berlin, {Jesse A.} and Michael Bosse and Bruce Browner and Brenda Gillespie and Alan Jones and Peter O'Brien and Rudolf Poolman and Macleod, {Mark D.} and Timothy Carey and Kellie Leitch and Stuart Bailey and Kevin Gurr and Ken Konito and Charlene Bartha and Isolina Low and MacBean, {Leila V.} and Mala Ramu and Susan Reiber and Ruth Strapp and Christina Tieszer and Kreder, {Hans J.} and Stephen, {David J G} and Axelrod, {Terry S.} and Yee, {Albert J M} and Richards, {Robin R.} and Joel Finkelstein and Wade Gofton and John Murnaghan and Joseph Schatztker and Truchan, {Lisa M}",
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AU - Obremskey, William

AU - Agel, Julie

AU - Archer, Kristin

AU - To, Philip

AU - Tornetta, Paul

AU - Bhandari, Mohit

AU - Guyatt, Gordon

AU - Sanders, David W.

AU - Schemitsch, Emil H.

AU - Swiontkowski, Marc

AU - Walter, Stephen

AU - Sprague, Sheila

AU - Heels-Ansdell, Diane

AU - Buckingham, Lisa

AU - Leece, Pamela

AU - Viveiros, Helena

AU - Mignott, Tashay

AU - Ansell, Natalie

AU - Sidorkewicz, Natalie

AU - Bombardier, Claire

AU - Berlin, Jesse A.

AU - Bosse, Michael

AU - Browner, Bruce

AU - Gillespie, Brenda

AU - Jones, Alan

AU - O'Brien, Peter

AU - Poolman, Rudolf

AU - Macleod, Mark D.

AU - Carey, Timothy

AU - Leitch, Kellie

AU - Bailey, Stuart

AU - Gurr, Kevin

AU - Konito, Ken

AU - Bartha, Charlene

AU - Low, Isolina

AU - MacBean, Leila V.

AU - Ramu, Mala

AU - Reiber, Susan

AU - Strapp, Ruth

AU - Tieszer, Christina

AU - Kreder, Hans J.

AU - Stephen, David J G

AU - Axelrod, Terry S.

AU - Yee, Albert J M

AU - Richards, Robin R.

AU - Finkelstein, Joel

AU - Gofton, Wade

AU - Murnaghan, John

AU - Schatztker, Joseph

AU - Truchan, Lisa M

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N2 - Objective: To study the activity and incidence of knee pain after sustaining an isolated tibia fracture treated with an infrapatellar intramedullary nail at 1 year. Design: Retrospective review of prospective cohort. Setting: Multicenter Academic and Community hospitals. Patients: Four hundred thirty-seven patients with an isolated tibia fracture completed a 12-month assessment on pain and self-reported activity. Intervention: Infrapatellar intramedullary nail. Outcomes: Demographic information, comorbid conditions, injury characteristics, and surgical technique were recorded. Knee pain was defined on a 1-7 scale with 1 being "no pain" and 7 being a "very great deal of pain." Knee pain >4 was considered clinically significant. Patients reported if they were "able," "able with difficulty," or "unable" to perform the following activities: kneel, run, climb stairs, and walk prolonged. Variables were tested in multilevel multivariable regression analyses. Results: In knee pain, 11% of patients reported a "good deal" to a "very great deal" of pain (>4), and 52% of patients reported "no" or "very little" pain at 12 months. In activity at 12 months, 26% and 29% of patients were unable to kneel or run, respectively, and 31% and 35% of patients, respectively, stated they were able with difficulty or unable to use stairs or walk. Conclusions: Clinically significant knee pain (>4/7) was present in 11% of patients 1 year after a tibia fracture. Of note, 31%-71% of patients had difficulty performing or were unable to perform routine daily activities of kneeling, running, and stair climbing, or walking prolonged distances.

AB - Objective: To study the activity and incidence of knee pain after sustaining an isolated tibia fracture treated with an infrapatellar intramedullary nail at 1 year. Design: Retrospective review of prospective cohort. Setting: Multicenter Academic and Community hospitals. Patients: Four hundred thirty-seven patients with an isolated tibia fracture completed a 12-month assessment on pain and self-reported activity. Intervention: Infrapatellar intramedullary nail. Outcomes: Demographic information, comorbid conditions, injury characteristics, and surgical technique were recorded. Knee pain was defined on a 1-7 scale with 1 being "no pain" and 7 being a "very great deal of pain." Knee pain >4 was considered clinically significant. Patients reported if they were "able," "able with difficulty," or "unable" to perform the following activities: kneel, run, climb stairs, and walk prolonged. Variables were tested in multilevel multivariable regression analyses. Results: In knee pain, 11% of patients reported a "good deal" to a "very great deal" of pain (>4), and 52% of patients reported "no" or "very little" pain at 12 months. In activity at 12 months, 26% and 29% of patients were unable to kneel or run, respectively, and 31% and 35% of patients, respectively, stated they were able with difficulty or unable to use stairs or walk. Conclusions: Clinically significant knee pain (>4/7) was present in 11% of patients 1 year after a tibia fracture. Of note, 31%-71% of patients had difficulty performing or were unable to perform routine daily activities of kneeling, running, and stair climbing, or walking prolonged distances.

KW - functional outcome

KW - intramedullary nail

KW - knee pain

KW - tibia fracture

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