Characterization and impact of wound infection after pancreas transplantation

J. E. Everett, D. C. Wahoff, C. Statz, K. J. Gillingham, Angelika C Gruessner, Rainer W G Gruessner, P. F. Gores, D. E R Sutherland, D. L. Dunn, R. E. Condon, D. H. Wittmann, T. K. Hunt, R. J. Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To characterize the incidence, microbial pathogenesis, risk factors, and impact of wound infection after pancreas transplantation. Design: Retrospective analysis. Setting: A large university hospital. Patients: From January 1, 1990, to September 30, 1993, 197 patients underwent 207 consecutive pancreas transplantation procedures. Main Outcome Measures: Wound infection and patient and allograft survival rates at 1 year. Results: Sixty-nine patients (33%) suffered wound infections: 21 (10%) were superficial; 31 (15%), deep; and 17 (8%), combined. Most (74%) wound infections were monomicrobial. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida species were the most common pathogens. Prolonged operating time, older donors, and enteric drainage were associated with higher wound infection rates. Deep and combined wound infections led to allograft loss despite subsequent salvage procedures. Combined wound infection was associated with significantly higher mortality. Conclusions: A deep wound infection should be an indication for allograft removal. Antifungal prophylaxis, stringent donor criteria, and delayed primary wound closure should lower the incidence of wound infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1310-1317
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume129
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Pancreas Transplantation
Wound Infection
Allografts
Tissue Donors
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Incidence
Candida
Drainage
Survival Rate
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Everett, J. E., Wahoff, D. C., Statz, C., Gillingham, K. J., Gruessner, A. C., Gruessner, R. W. G., ... Howard, R. J. (1994). Characterization and impact of wound infection after pancreas transplantation. Archives of Surgery, 129(12), 1310-1317.

Characterization and impact of wound infection after pancreas transplantation. / Everett, J. E.; Wahoff, D. C.; Statz, C.; Gillingham, K. J.; Gruessner, Angelika C; Gruessner, Rainer W G; Gores, P. F.; Sutherland, D. E R; Dunn, D. L.; Condon, R. E.; Wittmann, D. H.; Hunt, T. K.; Howard, R. J.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 129, No. 12, 1994, p. 1310-1317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Everett, JE, Wahoff, DC, Statz, C, Gillingham, KJ, Gruessner, AC, Gruessner, RWG, Gores, PF, Sutherland, DER, Dunn, DL, Condon, RE, Wittmann, DH, Hunt, TK & Howard, RJ 1994, 'Characterization and impact of wound infection after pancreas transplantation', Archives of Surgery, vol. 129, no. 12, pp. 1310-1317.
Everett, J. E. ; Wahoff, D. C. ; Statz, C. ; Gillingham, K. J. ; Gruessner, Angelika C ; Gruessner, Rainer W G ; Gores, P. F. ; Sutherland, D. E R ; Dunn, D. L. ; Condon, R. E. ; Wittmann, D. H. ; Hunt, T. K. ; Howard, R. J. / Characterization and impact of wound infection after pancreas transplantation. In: Archives of Surgery. 1994 ; Vol. 129, No. 12. pp. 1310-1317.
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AU - Gruessner, Rainer W G

AU - Gores, P. F.

AU - Sutherland, D. E R

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AU - Howard, R. J.

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