Characterization of nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for aerodynamic flow control

Robert Dawson, Jesse C Little

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators are studied experimentally in quiescent atmosphere. Per unit length peak energy and instantaneous peak power are calculated using simultaneous voltage and current measurements. Electrical characteristics are evaluated as a function of peak voltage, pulse frequency, discharge length and dielectric thickness. Schlieren imaging is used to provide a relative measure of discharge energy that is coupled to the near surface gas as heat for the same parameters. Characteristics of the DBD load have a substantial effect on the voltage and current traces which are reflected in the peak energy and peak power. Both peak energy and compression wave strength depend primarily on dielectric thickness and secondarily on actuator length although this is not universal in the case of energy necessitating examination of alternative calculation strategies. Peak power is mainly dependent on actuator length which is inconsistent with schlieren data as expected. Higher pulse frequency produces higher pulse energy, but is primarily attributed to heating of the actuator and power supply components. This effect is mainly observed for short actuators. Pulse energy increases as peak voltage to the power 3.5 similar to ac-DBD plasma actuators. A single data set from the center of the test matrix shows compression wave strength increases as voltage to the power 7.4 and energy to the power 1.9 in the range surveyed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication6th AIAA Flow Control Conference 2012
StatePublished - 2012
Event6th AIAA Flow Control Conference 2012 - New Orleans, LA, United States
Duration: Jun 25 2012Jun 28 2012

Other

Other6th AIAA Flow Control Conference 2012
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans, LA
Period6/25/126/28/12

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Flow control
Aerodynamics
Actuators
Plasmas
Electric potential
Voltage measurement
Electric current measurement
Compaction
Gases
Imaging techniques
Heating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Characterization of nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for aerodynamic flow control. / Dawson, Robert; Little, Jesse C.

6th AIAA Flow Control Conference 2012. 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dawson, R & Little, JC 2012, Characterization of nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for aerodynamic flow control. in 6th AIAA Flow Control Conference 2012. 6th AIAA Flow Control Conference 2012, New Orleans, LA, United States, 6/25/12.
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AB - Nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators are studied experimentally in quiescent atmosphere. Per unit length peak energy and instantaneous peak power are calculated using simultaneous voltage and current measurements. Electrical characteristics are evaluated as a function of peak voltage, pulse frequency, discharge length and dielectric thickness. Schlieren imaging is used to provide a relative measure of discharge energy that is coupled to the near surface gas as heat for the same parameters. Characteristics of the DBD load have a substantial effect on the voltage and current traces which are reflected in the peak energy and peak power. Both peak energy and compression wave strength depend primarily on dielectric thickness and secondarily on actuator length although this is not universal in the case of energy necessitating examination of alternative calculation strategies. Peak power is mainly dependent on actuator length which is inconsistent with schlieren data as expected. Higher pulse frequency produces higher pulse energy, but is primarily attributed to heating of the actuator and power supply components. This effect is mainly observed for short actuators. Pulse energy increases as peak voltage to the power 3.5 similar to ac-DBD plasma actuators. A single data set from the center of the test matrix shows compression wave strength increases as voltage to the power 7.4 and energy to the power 1.9 in the range surveyed.

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