Charter building and labor market contacts in two-year colleges

Regina J Deil-Amen, James E. Rosenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How do unselective schools that serve disadvantaged students get employers to recognize their graduates' qualifications? This study examined whether low-status colleges (whose credentials may not be widely understood) rely on the traditional college charter or engage in charter-building activities to get employers to recognize students' value. Examining occupational programs in public and private two-year colleges, the authors found that both types of colleges do similar activities but do them differently. While these community colleges act as if additional action is not required, these private two-year occupational colleges actively engage in charter-building activities, mediating the hiring process by conveying students' qualifications through trusted relationships and aiming to place all their graduates, including many disadvantaged students, in jobs. The authors speculate that charter building identifies previously ignored issues and may suggest ways that low-status schools can make hiring into an institutional process in which students' lower social backgrounds have a less-negative influence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-265
Number of pages21
JournalSociology of Education
Volume77
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

charter
labor market
contact
building activity
hiring
student
qualification
employer
graduate
social background
school
community
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Charter building and labor market contacts in two-year colleges. / Deil-Amen, Regina J; Rosenbaum, James E.

In: Sociology of Education, Vol. 77, No. 3, 07.2004, p. 245-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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