Chemical structures and mode of action of intravenous glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockers: A review

Mehrnoosh Hashemzadeh, Matthew Furukawa, Sarah Goldsberry, Mohammad R Movahed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists compose a subcategory of antiplatelet medications that reduce thrombus formation through the blockade of key binding sites needed to stabilize the forming platelet aggregate. The GP IIb/IIIa receptors have been identified as a therapeutic target in reducing the occurrence of platelet-dependent thrombus formation. One advantage of GP IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists is that because GP IIb/IIIa is platelet-specific, inhibition ofshis receptor does not affect platelet adhesion. This may contribute to hemostasis without leading to ischemic damage. The platelet-specific pharmacological activity of GP IIb/IIIa - receptor antagonists has allowed for its broad use in clinical settings. Based on clinical trials, GP IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists have been extensively studied and used in patients with acute coronary syndrome or during percutaneous coronary interventions. The goat of the present article is to provide a detailed review of the chemical structures and mode of action of currently used Food and Drug Administration-approved GP IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-197
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental and Clinical Cardiology
Volume13
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex
Blood Platelets
Thrombosis
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
United States Food and Drug Administration
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Hemostasis
Goats
Binding Sites
Clinical Trials
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Antagonist
  • Antiplatelet
  • Antithrombotic
  • Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor
  • Stenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Physiology

Cite this

Chemical structures and mode of action of intravenous glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockers : A review. / Hashemzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Furukawa, Matthew; Goldsberry, Sarah; Movahed, Mohammad R.

In: Experimental and Clinical Cardiology, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2008, p. 192-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hashemzadeh, Mehrnoosh ; Furukawa, Matthew ; Goldsberry, Sarah ; Movahed, Mohammad R. / Chemical structures and mode of action of intravenous glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockers : A review. In: Experimental and Clinical Cardiology. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 192-197.
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