Chest compression release velocity factors during out-of-hospital cardiac resuscitation

Samuel Beger, John Sutter, Tyler Vadeboncoeur, Annemarie Silver, Chengcheng Hu, Daniel W. Spaite, Bentley Bobrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Higher chest compression release velocity (CCRV) has been associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and patient factors have been associated with variations in chest wall compliance and compressibility. We evaluated whether patient sex, age, weight, and time in resuscitation were associated with CCRV during pre-hospital resuscitation from OHCA. Methods: Observational study of prospectively collected OHCA quality improvement data in two suburban EMS agencies in Arizona between 10/1/2008 and 12/31/2016. Subject-level mean CCRV during the first 10 min of compressions was correlated with categorical variables by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and with continuous variables by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Generalized estimating equation and linear mixed-effect models were used to study the trend of CCRV over time. Results: During the study period, 2535 adult OHCA cases were treated. After exclusion criteria, 1140 cases remained for analysis. Median duration of recorded compressions was 8.70 min during the first 10 min of CPR. An overall decline in CCRV was observed even after adjusting for compression depth. The subject-level mean CCRV was higher for minutes 0–5 than for minutes 5–10 (mean 347.9 mm/s vs. 339.0 mm/s, 95% CI of the difference −12.4 to −5.4, p < 0.0001). Males exhibited a greater mean CCRV compared to females [344.4 mm/s (IQR 307.3–384.6) vs. 331.5 mm/s (IQR 285.3–385.5), p = 0.013]. Mean CCRV was negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with patient weight. Conclusion: CCRV declines significantly over the course of resuscitation. Patient characteristics including male sex, younger age, and increased weight were associated with a higher CCRV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-42
Number of pages6
JournalResuscitation
Volume145
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

Fingerprint

Resuscitation
Thorax
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Nonparametric Statistics
Weights and Measures
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Thoracic Wall
Quality Improvement
Compliance
Observational Studies

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrest
  • CCRV
  • Chest compression release velocity
  • Chest compressions
  • Compressions
  • CPR
  • Emergency medicine
  • EMS
  • Feedback
  • Haemodynamics
  • OHCA
  • Out of hospital cardiac arrest
  • Resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Chest compression release velocity factors during out-of-hospital cardiac resuscitation. / Beger, Samuel; Sutter, John; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Silver, Annemarie; Hu, Chengcheng; Spaite, Daniel W.; Bobrow, Bentley.

In: Resuscitation, Vol. 145, 12.2019, p. 37-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beger, Samuel ; Sutter, John ; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler ; Silver, Annemarie ; Hu, Chengcheng ; Spaite, Daniel W. ; Bobrow, Bentley. / Chest compression release velocity factors during out-of-hospital cardiac resuscitation. In: Resuscitation. 2019 ; Vol. 145. pp. 37-42.
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abstract = "Background: Higher chest compression release velocity (CCRV) has been associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and patient factors have been associated with variations in chest wall compliance and compressibility. We evaluated whether patient sex, age, weight, and time in resuscitation were associated with CCRV during pre-hospital resuscitation from OHCA. Methods: Observational study of prospectively collected OHCA quality improvement data in two suburban EMS agencies in Arizona between 10/1/2008 and 12/31/2016. Subject-level mean CCRV during the first 10 min of compressions was correlated with categorical variables by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and with continuous variables by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Generalized estimating equation and linear mixed-effect models were used to study the trend of CCRV over time. Results: During the study period, 2535 adult OHCA cases were treated. After exclusion criteria, 1140 cases remained for analysis. Median duration of recorded compressions was 8.70 min during the first 10 min of CPR. An overall decline in CCRV was observed even after adjusting for compression depth. The subject-level mean CCRV was higher for minutes 0–5 than for minutes 5–10 (mean 347.9 mm/s vs. 339.0 mm/s, 95{\%} CI of the difference −12.4 to −5.4, p < 0.0001). Males exhibited a greater mean CCRV compared to females [344.4 mm/s (IQR 307.3–384.6) vs. 331.5 mm/s (IQR 285.3–385.5), p = 0.013]. Mean CCRV was negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with patient weight. Conclusion: CCRV declines significantly over the course of resuscitation. Patient characteristics including male sex, younger age, and increased weight were associated with a higher CCRV.",
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T1 - Chest compression release velocity factors during out-of-hospital cardiac resuscitation

AU - Beger, Samuel

AU - Sutter, John

AU - Vadeboncoeur, Tyler

AU - Silver, Annemarie

AU - Hu, Chengcheng

AU - Spaite, Daniel W.

AU - Bobrow, Bentley

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N2 - Background: Higher chest compression release velocity (CCRV) has been associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and patient factors have been associated with variations in chest wall compliance and compressibility. We evaluated whether patient sex, age, weight, and time in resuscitation were associated with CCRV during pre-hospital resuscitation from OHCA. Methods: Observational study of prospectively collected OHCA quality improvement data in two suburban EMS agencies in Arizona between 10/1/2008 and 12/31/2016. Subject-level mean CCRV during the first 10 min of compressions was correlated with categorical variables by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and with continuous variables by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Generalized estimating equation and linear mixed-effect models were used to study the trend of CCRV over time. Results: During the study period, 2535 adult OHCA cases were treated. After exclusion criteria, 1140 cases remained for analysis. Median duration of recorded compressions was 8.70 min during the first 10 min of CPR. An overall decline in CCRV was observed even after adjusting for compression depth. The subject-level mean CCRV was higher for minutes 0–5 than for minutes 5–10 (mean 347.9 mm/s vs. 339.0 mm/s, 95% CI of the difference −12.4 to −5.4, p < 0.0001). Males exhibited a greater mean CCRV compared to females [344.4 mm/s (IQR 307.3–384.6) vs. 331.5 mm/s (IQR 285.3–385.5), p = 0.013]. Mean CCRV was negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with patient weight. Conclusion: CCRV declines significantly over the course of resuscitation. Patient characteristics including male sex, younger age, and increased weight were associated with a higher CCRV.

AB - Background: Higher chest compression release velocity (CCRV) has been associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and patient factors have been associated with variations in chest wall compliance and compressibility. We evaluated whether patient sex, age, weight, and time in resuscitation were associated with CCRV during pre-hospital resuscitation from OHCA. Methods: Observational study of prospectively collected OHCA quality improvement data in two suburban EMS agencies in Arizona between 10/1/2008 and 12/31/2016. Subject-level mean CCRV during the first 10 min of compressions was correlated with categorical variables by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and with continuous variables by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Generalized estimating equation and linear mixed-effect models were used to study the trend of CCRV over time. Results: During the study period, 2535 adult OHCA cases were treated. After exclusion criteria, 1140 cases remained for analysis. Median duration of recorded compressions was 8.70 min during the first 10 min of CPR. An overall decline in CCRV was observed even after adjusting for compression depth. The subject-level mean CCRV was higher for minutes 0–5 than for minutes 5–10 (mean 347.9 mm/s vs. 339.0 mm/s, 95% CI of the difference −12.4 to −5.4, p < 0.0001). Males exhibited a greater mean CCRV compared to females [344.4 mm/s (IQR 307.3–384.6) vs. 331.5 mm/s (IQR 285.3–385.5), p = 0.013]. Mean CCRV was negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with patient weight. Conclusion: CCRV declines significantly over the course of resuscitation. Patient characteristics including male sex, younger age, and increased weight were associated with a higher CCRV.

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KW - Compressions

KW - CPR

KW - Emergency medicine

KW - EMS

KW - Feedback

KW - Haemodynamics

KW - OHCA

KW - Out of hospital cardiac arrest

KW - Resuscitation

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