Child healthcare workers in resource-limited areas improve health with innovative low-cost projects

Burris Duncan, Anna Mandalakas, Donna Staton, Bron Anders, Mirzada Kurbasic, Margaret Nakakeeto, Ghulam Mustafa, Alex Reyes, Doris Evangelista

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most child health workers in resource-limited communities are dedicated, imaginative, innovative practitioners with ideas that would improve the care of children and families. However, they often lack experience in seeking funds and implementing their ideas. In 2006, the Section on International Child Health in the American Academy of Pediatrics launched a program, I-CATCH to fill this gap. The program provides mentors to assist in writing a proposal for the community-conceived and community-driven idea to improve child health, makes a small amount of funds available to the selected proposals, and offers mentors to help with the project's implementation. To date, 29 projects in 20 different non-industrialized countries have been funded. The impressive results achieved by the four completed and three ongoing projects are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberfmr049
Pages (from-to)120-124
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Tropical Pediatrics
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

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Keywords

  • Child healthcare workers
  • Mentors
  • Resource-limited communities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Duncan, B., Mandalakas, A., Staton, D., Anders, B., Kurbasic, M., Nakakeeto, M., Mustafa, G., Reyes, A., & Evangelista, D. (2012). Child healthcare workers in resource-limited areas improve health with innovative low-cost projects. Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, 58(2), 120-124. [fmr049]. https://doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmr049