Choice Effects and the Ineffectiveness of Simulation: Response to Kühberger et al.

Shaun B Nichols, STEPHEN STICH, ALAN LESLIE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract: Kühberger et al. show that producing the Langer effect is considerably more difficult than has been assumed. Although their results clearly demonstrate a need for further exploration of the Langer effect, none of their arguments undermines the evidence against simulation theory that we presented in Nichols et al. (1996). In our study the actor subjects did show an effect, but the prediction subjects did not predict it, despite the fact that they were provided with all the details of the actor's situation. Further, we report additional evidence that corroborates our empirical case against simulation theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-445
Number of pages9
JournalMind & Language
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Philosophy
  • Linguistics and Language

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