Chromosomal abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme by comparative genomic hybridization: Correlation with radiation treatment outcome

Stephen L. Huhn, Gayatry Mohapatra, Andrew Bollen, Kathleen Lamborn, Michael D. Prados, Burt G. Feuerstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GM) is the most common and most malignant astrocytoma in adults. After surgery, radiation therapy extends patient survival; however, in vivo response to radiation therapy is variable. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the cytogenetic abnormalities of GM differ according to patient response to radiation therapy. Radiation response was defined by either progression [radiation- resistant (RR)] or resolution [radiation-sensitive (RS)] of tumor at the first postradiation radiographic imaging evaluation. Twenty RR and 10 RS frozen tissue specimens were subjected to cytogenetic analysis by comparative genomic hybridization. RS and RR specimens had different cytogenetic aberrations that mapped predominantly to chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 13, and 19. Relative gain of 7 occurred in 70% of the RR and 30% of the RS cases and was the most significant difference involving a single change between the two groups (P = 0.06). RR and RS specimens also differed in their patterns of simultaneous cytogenetic aberrations. A simultaneous gain of chromosomes 7 and 19 was found in 30% of the RR cases but was absent in the RS group. Concurrent loss of 9p23-24 and 13q14 regions was absent in the RS cohort but occurred in 30% of the RR series. This latter cytogenetic pattern was also associated with older age. Amplifications were more common in the RR series, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. The data suggest that GM with different in vivo responses to radiation therapy also differ cytogenetically.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1435-1443
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume5
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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