Chromosomal abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme tumors and glioma cell lines detected by comparative genomic hybridization

D. H. Kim, G. Mohapatra, A. Bollen, F. M. Waldman, Burt G.F. Feuerstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a recent molecular cytogenetic method that detects and localizes gains or losses in DNA copy number across the entire tumor genome. We used CGH to examine 9 glioma cell lines and 20 primary and 10 recurrent glioblastoma tumors. More than 25% of the primary tumors had gains on chromosome 7; they also had frequent losses on 9p, 10, 13 and Y. The losses on chromosome 13 included several interstitial deletions with a common area of loss at 13q21. The recurrent tumors not only had gains on chromosome 7 and losses on 9p, 10, 13 and Y but also frequent losses on 6 and 14. One recurrent tumor had a deletion of 10q22-26. Cell lines showed gains of 5p, 7 and Xp; frequent amplifications at 8q22-24.2, 7q21-32 and 3q26.2-29 and frequent losses on 4, 10, 13, 14 and Y. Because primary and recurrent tumors and cell lines showed abnormalities of DNA copy number on chromosomes 7, 10, 13 and Y, these regions may play a fundamental role in tumor initiation and/or progression. The propensity for losses on chromosomes 6 and 14 to occur in recurrent tumors suggests that these aberrations play a role in tumor recurrence, the development of resistance to therapy or both. Analysis of common areas of loss and gain in these tumors and cell lines provides a basis for future attempts to more finely map these genetic changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)812-819
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Glioblastoma
Tumor Cell Line
Glioma
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7
Neoplasms
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14
Cell Line
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6
DNA
Cytogenetics
Genome
Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Chromosomal abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme tumors and glioma cell lines detected by comparative genomic hybridization. / Kim, D. H.; Mohapatra, G.; Bollen, A.; Waldman, F. M.; Feuerstein, Burt G.F.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 60, No. 6, 1995, p. 812-819.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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