Chronic Infection and Severe Asthma

Tara F. Carr, Monica Kraft

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic bacterial infection is implicated in both the development and severity of asthma. The atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae have been identified in the airways of asthmatics and correlated with clinical features such as adult onset, exacerbation risks, steroid sensitivity, and symptom control. Asthmatic patients with evidence of bacterial infection may benefit from antibiotic treatment directed towards these atypical organisms. Examination of the airway microbiome may identify microbial communities that confer risk for or protection from severe asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-502
Number of pages20
JournalImmunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Keywords

  • Chlamydophila pneumoniae
  • Chronic infection
  • Macrolides
  • Microbiome
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae
  • Severe asthma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Chronic Infection and Severe Asthma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this