Chronic, painful lower extremity wounds: Postoperative pain management through the use of continuous infusion of regional anaesthesia supplied by a portable pump device

Christy L. Scimeca, Timothy K. Fisher, Manish Bharara, David G Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reducing and preventing postoperative pain are currently a topic of great interest. There are different modalities for providing analgesia that can provide an alternative or adjunct to opioid therapy. One mode of therapy involves the use of portable pain pump devices that can deliver continuous local anaesthesia directly to the site of interest. A considerable amount of attention in literature has been dedicated to using regional anaesthesia postoperatively for various surgical applications. However, to our knowledge, little or no work has been published concerning the use of infusion of regional anaesthesia in the treatment of painful lower extremity wounds. We present a case report of a 55-year-old gentleman with a complex past medical history, 2-year history of opioid dependency and a 2-week history of intractable pain associated with the combination of debilitating painful diabetic neuropathy and painful lower extremity wounds. After surgical debridement of the lower extremity wounds, substantial analgesia was achieved postoperatively through the implantation of a portable direct infusion pump device. The device supplied 2 ml/hour of 0·25% bupivacaine and resulted in a reduction in pain within the first hour of implantation. Although the device achieved maximal analgesia at 6 hours, we found that this could have been likely reduced through the use of a 5-ml bolus dose of 0·25% bupivacaine at the time of implantation. The device provided sufficient analgesia to the patient without any observed adverse effects, and showed significant potential in avoiding an increase in his requirement for other systemic analgesia including opioids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-198
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Wound Journal
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Conduction Anesthesia
Pain Management
Postoperative Pain
Analgesia
Lower Extremity
Equipment and Supplies
Opioid Analgesics
Wounds and Injuries
Bupivacaine
Pain
Infusion Pumps
Intractable Pain
Diabetic Neuropathies
Debridement
Local Anesthesia
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{7d767cb2409145469d77e38e6e928722,
title = "Chronic, painful lower extremity wounds: Postoperative pain management through the use of continuous infusion of regional anaesthesia supplied by a portable pump device",
abstract = "Reducing and preventing postoperative pain are currently a topic of great interest. There are different modalities for providing analgesia that can provide an alternative or adjunct to opioid therapy. One mode of therapy involves the use of portable pain pump devices that can deliver continuous local anaesthesia directly to the site of interest. A considerable amount of attention in literature has been dedicated to using regional anaesthesia postoperatively for various surgical applications. However, to our knowledge, little or no work has been published concerning the use of infusion of regional anaesthesia in the treatment of painful lower extremity wounds. We present a case report of a 55-year-old gentleman with a complex past medical history, 2-year history of opioid dependency and a 2-week history of intractable pain associated with the combination of debilitating painful diabetic neuropathy and painful lower extremity wounds. After surgical debridement of the lower extremity wounds, substantial analgesia was achieved postoperatively through the implantation of a portable direct infusion pump device. The device supplied 2 ml/hour of 0·25{\%} bupivacaine and resulted in a reduction in pain within the first hour of implantation. Although the device achieved maximal analgesia at 6 hours, we found that this could have been likely reduced through the use of a 5-ml bolus dose of 0·25{\%} bupivacaine at the time of implantation. The device provided sufficient analgesia to the patient without any observed adverse effects, and showed significant potential in avoiding an increase in his requirement for other systemic analgesia including opioids.",
author = "Scimeca, {Christy L.} and Fisher, {Timothy K.} and Manish Bharara and Armstrong, {David G}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1111/j.1742-481X.2010.00675.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "195--198",
journal = "International Wound Journal",
issn = "1742-4801",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic, painful lower extremity wounds

T2 - Postoperative pain management through the use of continuous infusion of regional anaesthesia supplied by a portable pump device

AU - Scimeca, Christy L.

AU - Fisher, Timothy K.

AU - Bharara, Manish

AU - Armstrong, David G

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Reducing and preventing postoperative pain are currently a topic of great interest. There are different modalities for providing analgesia that can provide an alternative or adjunct to opioid therapy. One mode of therapy involves the use of portable pain pump devices that can deliver continuous local anaesthesia directly to the site of interest. A considerable amount of attention in literature has been dedicated to using regional anaesthesia postoperatively for various surgical applications. However, to our knowledge, little or no work has been published concerning the use of infusion of regional anaesthesia in the treatment of painful lower extremity wounds. We present a case report of a 55-year-old gentleman with a complex past medical history, 2-year history of opioid dependency and a 2-week history of intractable pain associated with the combination of debilitating painful diabetic neuropathy and painful lower extremity wounds. After surgical debridement of the lower extremity wounds, substantial analgesia was achieved postoperatively through the implantation of a portable direct infusion pump device. The device supplied 2 ml/hour of 0·25% bupivacaine and resulted in a reduction in pain within the first hour of implantation. Although the device achieved maximal analgesia at 6 hours, we found that this could have been likely reduced through the use of a 5-ml bolus dose of 0·25% bupivacaine at the time of implantation. The device provided sufficient analgesia to the patient without any observed adverse effects, and showed significant potential in avoiding an increase in his requirement for other systemic analgesia including opioids.

AB - Reducing and preventing postoperative pain are currently a topic of great interest. There are different modalities for providing analgesia that can provide an alternative or adjunct to opioid therapy. One mode of therapy involves the use of portable pain pump devices that can deliver continuous local anaesthesia directly to the site of interest. A considerable amount of attention in literature has been dedicated to using regional anaesthesia postoperatively for various surgical applications. However, to our knowledge, little or no work has been published concerning the use of infusion of regional anaesthesia in the treatment of painful lower extremity wounds. We present a case report of a 55-year-old gentleman with a complex past medical history, 2-year history of opioid dependency and a 2-week history of intractable pain associated with the combination of debilitating painful diabetic neuropathy and painful lower extremity wounds. After surgical debridement of the lower extremity wounds, substantial analgesia was achieved postoperatively through the implantation of a portable direct infusion pump device. The device supplied 2 ml/hour of 0·25% bupivacaine and resulted in a reduction in pain within the first hour of implantation. Although the device achieved maximal analgesia at 6 hours, we found that this could have been likely reduced through the use of a 5-ml bolus dose of 0·25% bupivacaine at the time of implantation. The device provided sufficient analgesia to the patient without any observed adverse effects, and showed significant potential in avoiding an increase in his requirement for other systemic analgesia including opioids.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952701964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77952701964&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1742-481X.2010.00675.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1742-481X.2010.00675.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 20602650

AN - SCOPUS:77952701964

VL - 7

SP - 195

EP - 198

JO - International Wound Journal

JF - International Wound Journal

SN - 1742-4801

IS - 3

ER -