Climate change and ecosystems of the Southwestern United States

Steve Archer, Katharine I. Predick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) is a program by the University of Arizona that aims to study the effects of climate variability and longer-term climate change on human and natural systems in the Southwest United States. The program has already predicted that the southwestern United States will become drier and the transition to a more arid climate is already taking place. Other projections include fewer frost days, warmer temperatures, greater water demand by plants, animals and people, increased frequency of extreme weather events, warmer nights, declines in snow pack, an earlier spring snow melt, which will then reduce water supply, lengthen the dry season, create conditions for drought and insect outbreaks, and increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-28
Number of pages6
JournalRangelands
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

climate change
climate
ecosystem
snow
water demand
drought
wildfire
frost
water management
projection
dry season
water supply
animal
melt
insect
weather
water
event
demand
temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Ecology

Cite this

Climate change and ecosystems of the Southwestern United States. / Archer, Steve; Predick, Katharine I.

In: Rangelands, Vol. 30, No. 3, 2008, p. 23-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Archer, Steve ; Predick, Katharine I. / Climate change and ecosystems of the Southwestern United States. In: Rangelands. 2008 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 23-28.
@article{5210681eab814deba0c4e2d41ddfa213,
title = "Climate change and ecosystems of the Southwestern United States",
abstract = "The Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) is a program by the University of Arizona that aims to study the effects of climate variability and longer-term climate change on human and natural systems in the Southwest United States. The program has already predicted that the southwestern United States will become drier and the transition to a more arid climate is already taking place. Other projections include fewer frost days, warmer temperatures, greater water demand by plants, animals and people, increased frequency of extreme weather events, warmer nights, declines in snow pack, an earlier spring snow melt, which will then reduce water supply, lengthen the dry season, create conditions for drought and insect outbreaks, and increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires.",
author = "Steve Archer and Predick, {Katharine I.}",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.2111/1551-501X(2008)30[23:CCAEOT]2.0.CO;2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "23--28",
journal = "Rangelands",
issn = "0190-0528",
publisher = "Society for Range Management",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Climate change and ecosystems of the Southwestern United States

AU - Archer, Steve

AU - Predick, Katharine I.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - The Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) is a program by the University of Arizona that aims to study the effects of climate variability and longer-term climate change on human and natural systems in the Southwest United States. The program has already predicted that the southwestern United States will become drier and the transition to a more arid climate is already taking place. Other projections include fewer frost days, warmer temperatures, greater water demand by plants, animals and people, increased frequency of extreme weather events, warmer nights, declines in snow pack, an earlier spring snow melt, which will then reduce water supply, lengthen the dry season, create conditions for drought and insect outbreaks, and increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires.

AB - The Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) is a program by the University of Arizona that aims to study the effects of climate variability and longer-term climate change on human and natural systems in the Southwest United States. The program has already predicted that the southwestern United States will become drier and the transition to a more arid climate is already taking place. Other projections include fewer frost days, warmer temperatures, greater water demand by plants, animals and people, increased frequency of extreme weather events, warmer nights, declines in snow pack, an earlier spring snow melt, which will then reduce water supply, lengthen the dry season, create conditions for drought and insect outbreaks, and increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=64849088210&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=64849088210&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2111/1551-501X(2008)30[23:CCAEOT]2.0.CO;2

DO - 10.2111/1551-501X(2008)30[23:CCAEOT]2.0.CO;2

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:64849088210

VL - 30

SP - 23

EP - 28

JO - Rangelands

JF - Rangelands

SN - 0190-0528

IS - 3

ER -