Climate, niche evolution, and diversification of the "bird-cage" evening primroses (Oenothera, sections Anogra and Kleinia)

Margaret E.K. Evans, Stephen A. Smith, Rachel S. Flynn, Michael J. Donoghue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

184 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We integrate climatic niche models and dated phylogenies to characterize the evolution of climatic niches in Oenothera sections Anogra and Kleinia (Onagraceae), and from that we make inferences on diversification in relation to climate. The evolution of climatic tolerances in Anogra + Kleinia has been heterogeneous, across phylogenetic groups and across different dimensions of climate. All the extant taxa occur in semiarid to arid conditions (annual precipitation of 10.1-49.1 cm and high temperatures in the warmest month of 28.5°-40.1°C), but there is striking variation among taxa in their climatic tolerances, especially temperature (minimum temperatures in the coldest month of -14.0° to 5.3°C) and summer versus winter precipitation (precipitation in the warmest quarter of 0.6-19.4 cm). Climatic disparity is especially pronounced in two subclades (californica, deltoides) that radiated in the southwestern United States and California, apparently including both divergent and convergent evolution of climatic tolerances. This niche evolution is remarkable, given the probable timescale of the radiation (∼1 million years). We suggest that the spatiotemporal climatic heterogeneity of western North America has served as a driver of diversification. Our data are also consistent with Axelrod's hypothesis that the spread of arid conditions in western North America stimulated diversification of arid-adapted lineages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-240
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Naturalist
Volume173
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

speciation (biology)
Molecular Sequence Data
Kleinia
Biological Adaptation
Oenothera
Oenothera biennis
Biological Evolution
dicotyledon
aviary birds
Chloroplast DNA
precipitation (climatology)
Biological Models
Bayes Theorem
Genetic Models
Phylogeny
Bayesian theory
North America
Magnoliopsida
chloroplast DNA
Climate

Keywords

  • Disparification
  • Ecological radiation
  • Phylogeny
  • Speciation
  • Species distribution models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Climate, niche evolution, and diversification of the "bird-cage" evening primroses (Oenothera, sections Anogra and Kleinia). / Evans, Margaret E.K.; Smith, Stephen A.; Flynn, Rachel S.; Donoghue, Michael J.

In: American Naturalist, Vol. 173, No. 2, 01.02.2009, p. 225-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Evans, Margaret E.K. ; Smith, Stephen A. ; Flynn, Rachel S. ; Donoghue, Michael J. / Climate, niche evolution, and diversification of the "bird-cage" evening primroses (Oenothera, sections Anogra and Kleinia). In: American Naturalist. 2009 ; Vol. 173, No. 2. pp. 225-240.
@article{3ebefd3f6c6c470dadf6642319cd2989,
title = "Climate, niche evolution, and diversification of the {"}bird-cage{"} evening primroses (Oenothera, sections Anogra and Kleinia)",
abstract = "We integrate climatic niche models and dated phylogenies to characterize the evolution of climatic niches in Oenothera sections Anogra and Kleinia (Onagraceae), and from that we make inferences on diversification in relation to climate. The evolution of climatic tolerances in Anogra + Kleinia has been heterogeneous, across phylogenetic groups and across different dimensions of climate. All the extant taxa occur in semiarid to arid conditions (annual precipitation of 10.1-49.1 cm and high temperatures in the warmest month of 28.5°-40.1°C), but there is striking variation among taxa in their climatic tolerances, especially temperature (minimum temperatures in the coldest month of -14.0° to 5.3°C) and summer versus winter precipitation (precipitation in the warmest quarter of 0.6-19.4 cm). Climatic disparity is especially pronounced in two subclades (californica, deltoides) that radiated in the southwestern United States and California, apparently including both divergent and convergent evolution of climatic tolerances. This niche evolution is remarkable, given the probable timescale of the radiation (∼1 million years). We suggest that the spatiotemporal climatic heterogeneity of western North America has served as a driver of diversification. Our data are also consistent with Axelrod's hypothesis that the spread of arid conditions in western North America stimulated diversification of arid-adapted lineages.",
keywords = "Disparification, Ecological radiation, Phylogeny, Speciation, Species distribution models",
author = "Evans, {Margaret E.K.} and Smith, {Stephen A.} and Flynn, {Rachel S.} and Donoghue, {Michael J.}",
year = "2009",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1086/595757",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "173",
pages = "225--240",
journal = "American Naturalist",
issn = "0003-0147",
publisher = "University of Chicago",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Climate, niche evolution, and diversification of the "bird-cage" evening primroses (Oenothera, sections Anogra and Kleinia)

AU - Evans, Margaret E.K.

AU - Smith, Stephen A.

AU - Flynn, Rachel S.

AU - Donoghue, Michael J.

PY - 2009/2/1

Y1 - 2009/2/1

N2 - We integrate climatic niche models and dated phylogenies to characterize the evolution of climatic niches in Oenothera sections Anogra and Kleinia (Onagraceae), and from that we make inferences on diversification in relation to climate. The evolution of climatic tolerances in Anogra + Kleinia has been heterogeneous, across phylogenetic groups and across different dimensions of climate. All the extant taxa occur in semiarid to arid conditions (annual precipitation of 10.1-49.1 cm and high temperatures in the warmest month of 28.5°-40.1°C), but there is striking variation among taxa in their climatic tolerances, especially temperature (minimum temperatures in the coldest month of -14.0° to 5.3°C) and summer versus winter precipitation (precipitation in the warmest quarter of 0.6-19.4 cm). Climatic disparity is especially pronounced in two subclades (californica, deltoides) that radiated in the southwestern United States and California, apparently including both divergent and convergent evolution of climatic tolerances. This niche evolution is remarkable, given the probable timescale of the radiation (∼1 million years). We suggest that the spatiotemporal climatic heterogeneity of western North America has served as a driver of diversification. Our data are also consistent with Axelrod's hypothesis that the spread of arid conditions in western North America stimulated diversification of arid-adapted lineages.

AB - We integrate climatic niche models and dated phylogenies to characterize the evolution of climatic niches in Oenothera sections Anogra and Kleinia (Onagraceae), and from that we make inferences on diversification in relation to climate. The evolution of climatic tolerances in Anogra + Kleinia has been heterogeneous, across phylogenetic groups and across different dimensions of climate. All the extant taxa occur in semiarid to arid conditions (annual precipitation of 10.1-49.1 cm and high temperatures in the warmest month of 28.5°-40.1°C), but there is striking variation among taxa in their climatic tolerances, especially temperature (minimum temperatures in the coldest month of -14.0° to 5.3°C) and summer versus winter precipitation (precipitation in the warmest quarter of 0.6-19.4 cm). Climatic disparity is especially pronounced in two subclades (californica, deltoides) that radiated in the southwestern United States and California, apparently including both divergent and convergent evolution of climatic tolerances. This niche evolution is remarkable, given the probable timescale of the radiation (∼1 million years). We suggest that the spatiotemporal climatic heterogeneity of western North America has served as a driver of diversification. Our data are also consistent with Axelrod's hypothesis that the spread of arid conditions in western North America stimulated diversification of arid-adapted lineages.

KW - Disparification

KW - Ecological radiation

KW - Phylogeny

KW - Speciation

KW - Species distribution models

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=61849115722&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=61849115722&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/595757

DO - 10.1086/595757

M3 - Article

C2 - 19072708

AN - SCOPUS:61849115722

VL - 173

SP - 225

EP - 240

JO - American Naturalist

JF - American Naturalist

SN - 0003-0147

IS - 2

ER -