Climatic predictors of the intra- and inter-annual distributions of plague cases in New Mexico based on 29 years of animal-based surveillance data

Heidi E Brown, Paul Ettestad, Pamela J. Reynolds, Ted L. Brown, Elizabeth S. Hatton, Jennifer L. Holmes, Gregory E. Glass, Kenneth L. Gage, Rebecca J. Eisen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Within the United States, the majority of human plague cases are reported from New Mexico. We describe climatic factors involved in intra- and inter-annual plague dynamics using animal-based surveillance data from that state. Unlike the clear seasonal pattern observed at lower elevations, cases occur randomly throughout the year at higher elevations. Increasing elevation corresponded with delayed mean time in case presentation. Using local meteorological data (previous year mean annual precipitation, total degrees over 27°C 3 years before and maximum winter temperatures 4 years before) we built a time-series model predicting annual case load that explained 75% of the variance in pet cases between years. Moreover, we found a significant correlation with observed annual human cases and predicted pet cases. Because covariates were time-lagged by at least 1 year, intensity of case loads can be predicted in advance of a plague season. Understanding associations between environmental and meteorological factors can be useful for anticipating future disease trends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-102
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Plague
Pets
Meteorological Concepts
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Climatic predictors of the intra- and inter-annual distributions of plague cases in New Mexico based on 29 years of animal-based surveillance data. / Brown, Heidi E; Ettestad, Paul; Reynolds, Pamela J.; Brown, Ted L.; Hatton, Elizabeth S.; Holmes, Jennifer L.; Glass, Gregory E.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Eisen, Rebecca J.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 82, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 95-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Heidi E ; Ettestad, Paul ; Reynolds, Pamela J. ; Brown, Ted L. ; Hatton, Elizabeth S. ; Holmes, Jennifer L. ; Glass, Gregory E. ; Gage, Kenneth L. ; Eisen, Rebecca J. / Climatic predictors of the intra- and inter-annual distributions of plague cases in New Mexico based on 29 years of animal-based surveillance data. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2010 ; Vol. 82, No. 1. pp. 95-102.
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