Clinical correlates of distorted auditory perception in first-episode psychosis

Rachel Morenz, Cindy Woolverton, R. Brock Frost, Nicole A. Kiewel, Nicholas J.K. Breitborde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: Auditory hallucinations are hypothesized to be based in distorted sensory perceptions, with increasingly distorted perceptions of reality possibly prompting the first psychotic phase of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Our goal was to examine the association between distorted auditory perceptions and psychotic symptomatology, social functioning and quality of life among individuals with first-episode psychosis. Methods: Forty individuals with first-episode psychosis completed assessments of distorted auditory perception, psychotic symptomatology, social functioning and quality of life. Results: Both negative (greater symptomatology) and positive clinical correlates (better quality of life) were associated with greater distorted auditory perceptions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that distorted auditory perceptions are associated with both positive and negative clinical correlates among individuals with first-episode psychosis. These results highlight the potential clinical importance of balancing the goal of symptomatic reduction with the need to maintain healthy coping strategies that may be biologically and psychologically entwined with the symptoms of psychosis, themselves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-251
Number of pages4
JournalEarly Intervention in Psychiatry
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • First-episode psychosis
  • Hallucination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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