Clinical outcome of using gastric remnant or jejunum or colon conduit in surgery for esophageal carcinoma with previous gastrectomy

Wang Jun, Wen Wei, Wu Weibing, Xu Jing, Zhen Fuxi, Xi Xiaoxiang, Lu Bihong, Tong Zhou, Chen Liang, Luo Jinhua

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: For esophageal carcinoma patients with early gastrectomy, individualized surgical plans—including selection of replacement conduit and operation route based on patient's new lesion and surgical history—can achieve the desired therapeutic effect and improve postoperative life quality. We investigated the outcomes at our institution. Methods: The clinical data of 42 esophageal carcinoma patients with early gastrectomy were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Esophagectomy was performed combining replacement with remnant stomach in 16 patients, jejunum in 17, and colon in 9. Esophagectomy combining replacement with gastric remnant got advantages of shorter operation time and less bleeding over that of replacement with jejunum or colon. Gastric remnant group scored higher on the QLQ-C30 questionnaire than jejunum or colon group with respect to overall quality of life, physical function, and social relationships. In QLQ-OES18 questionnaire, the scores of appetite recovery and reflux mitigation were more favorable in remnant stomach group than those in jejunum or colon group. Survival analysis showed no significant difference in survival rate among the patients undergoing replacement with gastric remnant, jejunum, or colon. Conclusions: For esophageal carcinoma patients with early gastrectomy, esophagus-gastric remnant anastomosis possesses advantages of shorter operation time, less surgical trauma, and greater life quality after surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)729-737
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume115
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Gastric Stump
Jejunum
Gastrectomy
Colon
Carcinoma
Esophagectomy
Quality of Life
Bleeding Time
Therapeutic Uses
Appetite
Survival Analysis
Esophagus
Survival Rate
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • alimentary continuity reconstruction
  • esophageal carcinoma
  • gastric remnant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Clinical outcome of using gastric remnant or jejunum or colon conduit in surgery for esophageal carcinoma with previous gastrectomy. / Jun, Wang; Wei, Wen; Weibing, Wu; Jing, Xu; Fuxi, Zhen; Xiaoxiang, Xi; Bihong, Lu; Zhou, Tong; Liang, Chen; Jinhua, Luo.

In: Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 115, No. 6, 01.05.2017, p. 729-737.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jun, W, Wei, W, Weibing, W, Jing, X, Fuxi, Z, Xiaoxiang, X, Bihong, L, Zhou, T, Liang, C & Jinhua, L 2017, 'Clinical outcome of using gastric remnant or jejunum or colon conduit in surgery for esophageal carcinoma with previous gastrectomy', Journal of Surgical Oncology, vol. 115, no. 6, pp. 729-737. https://doi.org/10.1002/jso.24564
Jun, Wang ; Wei, Wen ; Weibing, Wu ; Jing, Xu ; Fuxi, Zhen ; Xiaoxiang, Xi ; Bihong, Lu ; Zhou, Tong ; Liang, Chen ; Jinhua, Luo. / Clinical outcome of using gastric remnant or jejunum or colon conduit in surgery for esophageal carcinoma with previous gastrectomy. In: Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2017 ; Vol. 115, No. 6. pp. 729-737.
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AU - Zhou, Tong

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