Clinical sleep disorder profiles in a large sample of trauma survivors

An interdisciplinary view of posttraumatic sleep disturbance

Barry Krakow, Patricia L Haynes, Teddy D. Warner, Dominic Melendrez, Brandy N. Sisley, Lisa Johnston, Michael Hollifield, Samuel Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: To examine the relationship between psychiatric symptoms and self-reported sleep, sleepiness, and nightmare complaints in a convenience sample of 437 trauma survivors. Method: Based on symptom severity reports, individuals were classified as having psychophysiological insomnia (PPI), chronic nightmare disorder (CND), and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) profiles. Individuals with each symptom profile were compared to individuals without the respective profile on sleep indices, sleepiness-related impairment, and psychiatric distress (anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress symptoms). Results: Individuals with PPI (76%), CND (79%), SDB (68%), or all three profiles (46%) had significantly worse sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, total sleep time, sleep-related functional impairment, and psychiatric distress compared to those without each disorder profile. Conclusions: The majority of trauma survivors in this sample suffered from sleep complaints sufficiently severe to warrant independent clinical attention by sleep medicine specialists. Longitudinal studies are necessary to determine whether these disturbances are caused exclusively by PTSD or another sleep disorder comorbid with PTSD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-15
Number of pages10
JournalSleep and Hypnosis
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2007

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Survivors
Sleep
Wounds and Injuries
Psychiatry
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Anxiety
Depression
Sleep Wake Disorders
Longitudinal Studies
Medicine

Keywords

  • Insomia
  • Nightmares
  • PTSD
  • Sleep-disordered breathing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology

Cite this

Clinical sleep disorder profiles in a large sample of trauma survivors : An interdisciplinary view of posttraumatic sleep disturbance. / Krakow, Barry; Haynes, Patricia L; Warner, Teddy D.; Melendrez, Dominic; Sisley, Brandy N.; Johnston, Lisa; Hollifield, Michael; Lee, Samuel.

In: Sleep and Hypnosis, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2007, p. 6-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krakow, B, Haynes, PL, Warner, TD, Melendrez, D, Sisley, BN, Johnston, L, Hollifield, M & Lee, S 2007, 'Clinical sleep disorder profiles in a large sample of trauma survivors: An interdisciplinary view of posttraumatic sleep disturbance', Sleep and Hypnosis, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 6-15.
Krakow, Barry ; Haynes, Patricia L ; Warner, Teddy D. ; Melendrez, Dominic ; Sisley, Brandy N. ; Johnston, Lisa ; Hollifield, Michael ; Lee, Samuel. / Clinical sleep disorder profiles in a large sample of trauma survivors : An interdisciplinary view of posttraumatic sleep disturbance. In: Sleep and Hypnosis. 2007 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 6-15.
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