Cloud condensation nuclei concentrations in Southern Arizona: Instrumentation and early observations

S. Philippin, Eric Betterton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During an ongoing study to measure cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, a new automated thermal diffusion CCN counter was operated during the months January through June 1994 near the summit of Mt. Lemmon in the Catalina Mountains at about 2700 m elevation. The instrument records data continuously at 5-minute intervals 24 hours a day. The status of the instrument and the data are monitored remotely by telephone modem. For the 123-day, continuous study the average CCN concentration was found to range between a few tens and a few hundred nuclei per cm3 at supersaturations between 0.3 and 0.7%. Diurnal variations were observed, as well as other possible influences, such as wind speed, wind direction and mixing depth. At a constant supersaturation of 0.35% the CCN concentration is typically on the order of 50 to 150 nuclei per cm3. A description of the instrumentation and early observations are presented and discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-275
Number of pages13
JournalAtmospheric Research
Volume43
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1997

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cloud condensation nucleus
instrumentation
supersaturation
wind direction
diurnal variation
wind velocity
mountain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Cloud condensation nuclei concentrations in Southern Arizona : Instrumentation and early observations. / Philippin, S.; Betterton, Eric.

In: Atmospheric Research, Vol. 43, No. 3, 03.1997, p. 263-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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